Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt

Volume 15 Issue 21 .                                                                                     Fall 2020

Safety Source

Thank you for being a Safety Source family! 
Cooler Weather and Home Safety Tips Edition

This week we want to celebrate Injury Free Day which is on November 18th 2020. There are interactive tools for your children to learn about home safety as well as information for parents. We hope this will be a fun way to learn about important safety topics together as a family. Let us know if we can be a resource to you in anyway! As always, we try to include the best topics to keep your family happy, healthy, and safe! If you wish to see a particular topic or question addressed in our next issue, please let us know!

Shining A Light On Injury Prevention

Join our Injury Free Coalition for Kids- Nashville and the 40+ Injury Free Coalition for Kids (IFCK) sites around the country as we celebrate the inaugural National Injury Prevention Day, November 18, 2020. Injury prevention practitioners and their supporters around the country will be wearing green, the coalition’s color, lighting in green selected landmarks in their area, and hosting a Twitter chat. Individual coalitions received support to also conduct their own special programming.

The goal of National Injury Prevention Day is to ‘shine a light’ on pediatric injuries, the leading cause of death for children older than one year of age. The day will also highlight the field’s many successes, promoting safety practices, products, and policies that are known to prevent injuries. The IFCK-Nashville team will be joining IFCK national staff and other coalitions in a Twitter chat from 1-2 pm (EST) to promote the urgent need to prevent injuries. Planned topics for the chat include motor vehicle crashes, poisonings, sleep-related deaths among infants, general home safety, and holiday safety. Join the conversation by tagging your Tweets with #BeInjuryFree, and consider green attire on November 18th

https://twitter.com/injuryfree

Visit our Website for More Safety Tips
Newsletter Highlights


Video for Kids

Interactive video for kids to learn about medication safety

Helmet Safety Activity

Learn how which helmet you need to use for certain activities! 

Interactive Quiz about Safety

Test your child's knowledge about home safety through an interactive online quiz. 

More Information for Parents

Information for parents about Indoor Medication Safety

Stair Safety

Young children often view the stairs in their home as another area to play. Unfortunately, it is the exact opposite. Unintentional falls are the leading cause of non-fatal injuries for children in the United States.1 These injuries resulted from activities such as climbing on furniture, playing near an unsecured window, falling down stairs or playing on playgrounds.1 Every day, approximately 8,000 children are treated in U.S. emergency rooms for fall-related injuries.2 This adds up to almost 2.8 million children each year.2

Follow these tips to help prevent stair related injuries in your home:

  • Always use an approved safety gate at both the bottom and top of the stairs. Be sure to read the manufacturer’s instructions which includes any related warning labels.
  • Not all safety gates are designed to be used at the top of the stairs. Be sure to check the manufactures instructions regarding your safety gate. Use hardware-mounted gates for the top of the stairs. Gates that only press against walls (pressure-mounted gates) are not secure enough to prevent falls at the top of stairs.4
  • Keep stairs free of toys and other clutter that may cause tripping and always monitor your child on the stairs.
  • Remember to educate your child about the dangers of playing on the stairs and to avoid carrying toys and other objects while climbing the stairs. Small children can lose their balance if carrying objects while climbing the stairs.
  • Remember to always use the handrail.
  • When carrying your child up or down the steps be sure to have one hand free to hold onto the railing. Avoid carrying anything else besides your child.

Falls can happen both inside and outside of the home. Keep these safety tips in mind to avoid injury to your child. Visit our website here for more injury prevention tips.

  1. https://www.safekids.org/falls
  2. https://www.cdc.gov/safechild/falls/index.html
  3. https://www.aappublications.org/content/33/9/36.6
  4. https://makesafehappen.com/articles/stair-safety-kids
Medication Safety

Each year in the United States, more than 2,200 children – or six kids a day – die from an injury in the home.1Infants and toddlers are constantly exploring the new world around them. This includes the desire to touch and taste every object in their sight. Young children 6 months to 3 years old are at the highest risk for choking on food and non-food items.2

Follow these tips to help prevent your toddler from choking:

  • See the world from your toddler’s point of view. Get on your hands and knees so that you can inspect your home from your child’s eyelevel. You may be surprised at what you can find.
  • Make sure to only purchase age appropriate toys for your toddler. It is important to read the warning labels and instructions before making your selection.
  • Double check to make sure that any toy that you purchase doesn’t have small parts that could potentially be a choking hazard.
  • Keep in mind, button batteries found in electronic devices can be a choking hazard.
  • Remember to remove any cords or strings such as window blinds out of your child’s site and reach. If you have an active child, it is important to remove any chairs, tables, or other pieces of furniture away from windows in your home to avoid a potential window fall or strangulation.
  • Remember to keep small magnets away from your toddler. This can include magnets that are found in older children’s toys and refrigerator magnets. Colorful magnetic beads can be very harmful to your child as well. These items are often mistaken for candy or chocolate.
  • Review the recall.gov website often for more information about product recalls.
  • If you suspect that your child may have swallowed a magnet or another potential choking hazard, seek medical attention immediately.

Unfortunately, children are not aware of the potential dangers that surround them or the dangers that result from their actions. As parents, it is important to constantly explore and evaluate your home to make sure it is childproof for your toddler. For more safety tips, visit our website here.

  1. https://www.safekids.org/choking
  2. https://www.healthychildren.org/English/safety-prevention/at-home/Pages/Choking-Hazards-Parents-of-Young-Children-Should-Know-About.aspx
Choking Prevention in Children

Each year in the United States, more than 2,200 children – or six kids a day – die from an injury in the home.1Infants and toddlers are constantly exploring the new world around them. This includes the desire to touch and taste every object in their sight. Young children 6 months to 3 years old are at the highest risk for choking on food and non-food items.2

Follow these tips to help prevent your toddler from choking:

  • See the world from your toddler’s point of view. Get on your hands and knees so that you can inspect your home from your child’s eyelevel. You may be surprised at what you can find.
  • Make sure to only purchase age appropriate toys for your toddler. It is important to read the warning labels and instructions before making your selection.
  • Double check to make sure that any toy that you purchase doesn’t have small parts that could potentially be a choking hazard.
  • Keep in mind, button batteries found in electronic devices can be a choking hazard.
  • Remember to remove any cords or strings such as window blinds out of your child’s site and reach. If you have an active child, it is important to remove any chairs, tables, or other pieces of furniture away from windows in your home to avoid a potential window fall or strangulation.
  • Remember to keep small magnets away from your toddler. This can include magnets that are found in older children’s toys and refrigerator magnets. Colorful magnetic beads can be very harmful to your child as well. These items are often mistaken for candy or chocolate.
  • Review the recall.gov website often for more information about product recalls.
  • If you suspect that your child may have swallowed a magnet or another potential choking hazard, seek medical attention immediately.

Unfortunately, children are not aware of the potential dangers that surround them or the dangers that result from their actions. As parents, it is important to constantly explore and evaluate your home to make sure it is childproof for your toddler. For more safety tips, visit our website here.

  1. https://www.safekids.org/choking
  2. https://www.healthychildren.org/English/safety-prevention/at-home/Pages/Choking-Hazards-Parents-of-Young-Children-Should-Know-About.aspx
Fall Prevention for Children

Falls are the leading cause of non-fatal injury for children in the United States.1 For children under the age of 10, falls are typically related to injuries around the home and playground. To help prevent fall-related injuries around the home considered the following safety tips:

Stairs:

  • For children age 6 -24 months, use a hardware-mounted safety gate at both the top and bottom of the stairs. Avoid accordion style gates, which can trap an arm or a neck. 2
  • Also avoid leaving any toys or objects near or around the stairs

Windows:

  • · Use window guards on all windows that are located above the 1st floor.
  • · Keep window blinds away from children to avoid strangulation. Wrap window cords around wall brackets to keep them out of your toddler’s reach.
  • · Never put chairs, sofas, or anything else a child could use to climb on in front of a window.

TVs & Furniture:

  • Avoid TV tip-overs by securing your TV to a wall mount or using a furniture strap. It is also important to anchor your other large pieces of furniture like dressers and bookshelves due to children climbing onto or pulling themselves up which can cause serious injury including death.
  • Remember to cover your furniture pieces that contain hard and sharp edges or corners with furniture edge protectors that can stick onto the furniture and avoid injury.

Outside of the home:

  • When using a shopping cart, make sure to safely secure your child in using the safety belt. Never allow your child to ride on the back of the shopping cart to avoid the shopping cart tipping over and falling on him/her.
  • When using a changing table, always secure the child in using the security strap and never leave your baby alone.

Baby and toddlers are often very active and unaware of the potential dangers around them. Child proofing your home can help with avoiding injuries.

1. https://www.cdc.gov/safechild/falls/index.html

2. https://www.healthychildren.org/English/safety-prevention/at-home/Pages/Home-Safety-Heres-How.aspx

When Sleeping in the Car Seat becomes Dangerous

Sleep is vital to a child’s development and growth. When life becomes busy, it can be challenging to find time to schedule your child’s naptime. Often, children may fall asleep in the car while being transported from one activity to another.

It can be tempting as a caregiver to just place the car seat inside your home instead of taking the child out the car seat and risking waking them up during the process. While this may seem more convenient, it can be dangerous, and you could unintentionally be putting your baby at risk.

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, 62% of infant deaths that happen in a sitting device occur in car seat that has been moved into the home. When your baby is seated in a car seat, their heavy head can fall forward causing difficulty breathing and even suffocation. That is why car seats outside of moving cars are not safe for naps or overnight sleep for the first year of life. The same risk comes from upright strollers and baby swings.

Car seats remain a vital safety feature when used in the car and can reduce the child’s risk of injury during a car crash. It is important to continue to use the car seat when your vehicle is in motion but also remember to remove your child from the seat when leaving the car.

The Center for Disease Control (CDC) provides safety tips on how to help your child sleep safely. The tips include:

  • Placing the child on his or her back for all sleep times including naps and bedtime
  • Using a safe surface such as a mattress in a crib
  • Keep soft bedding such as blankets, pillows, toys, and additional padding out of the crib when the baby is sleeping
  • Experts recommend that your child sleeps in the same room as you but not in the same bed.

Again, we understand the importance of sleep and trying to ensure your child gets every minute of rest. But, we want to help you ensure your child is safe while sleeping. Below are some tips to help you remember to remove your sleeping child from the car seat once you arrive at home or your destination:

  • Set an alarm on your phone to remind you to remove your child from the car seat
  • Place an index card or sticky note on your steering wheel with a message to remind you to remove the child from the seat when sleeping
  • When possible schedule activities before or after your child’s naptime, to help reduce the chances on the child falling asleep in the car
  • Remind other caregivers of the importance of not allowing the child to sleep in the car seat outside of the vehicle.

Sources and More information

https://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/138/5/e20162938

https://www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/safesleep/index.html

https://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/144/1/e20182576

https://www.usnews.com/news/health-news/articles/2019-05-20/putting-your-child-to-sleep-in-a-car-seat-can-be-deadly

https://www.consumerreports.org/infant-car-seats/dos-and-donts-of-infant-car-seat-use/



Click for more information about Car Seats
Teen Impaired Driving

Driving while impaired by any substance puts you and others in harm’s way.1 Impaired driving can be caused by alcohol, marijuana, prescription drugs, or any other substance that can alter the driver’s mental status. According to the 2018 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), in 2018, 20.5 million people aged 16 or older drove under the influence of alcohol in the past year and 12.6 million drove under the influence of illicit drugs.3 Driving impaired is against the law in all 50 states including that the states where marijuana laws have changed.

The effects of drugged driving is dependent on the substance that was taken. For example, marijuana can slow reaction time, impair judgment of time and distance, and decrease coordination. Drivers who have used cocaine or methamphetamine can be aggressive and reckless when driving. Certain kinds of prescription medicines, including benzodiazepines and opioids, can cause drowsiness, dizziness, and impair the driver’s ability to think and use judgment.3 Even if the driver only drives under the influence using a small amount of the drug, it can still have an effect on their driving.

Teen drivers are more likely to be involved in a motor vehicle crash due to inexperience than any other group. Mixing inexperience with being under the influence can be a dangerous cocktail for both the driver and others on the road.

Remember these safety tips to stay safe on the road:

  • The best option for teen drivers is to avoid any substance that may lead to impaired driving.
  • If you are under the influence, use a ride-sharing app to get home or designate someone to be the sober driver.
  • Hold your family and friends accountable. Do not let a loved one get behind the wheel if they have been under the influence.
  • Consider appointing someone to the designated driver and collecting everyone’s car keys.

Visit our webpage here for more teen driving safety tips.

  1. https://www.nhtsa.gov/risky-driving/drug-impaired-driving
  2. https://www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/teendrinkinganddriving/index.html
  3. https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugfacts/drugged-driving
Are You interested in learning more about Child Passenger Safety?

We are now offering online webinars that offer important safety information about Child Passenger Safety. If you interested in learning more, or about us partnering with your organization, please contact us! 

Learn more about Online Webinars for Child Passenger Safety
Fun Recipes to Make as a Family

Easy recipes for your child to learn how to cook while having fun in the kitchen! 

Click for Recipe
Meet the Injury Prevention Team


Purnima Unni

is the Pediatric Trauma Injury Prevention Program Manager for Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt. She has a Masters in Public Health and is a Certified Health Education specialist with over 20 years of experience in injury prevention. She is a wife and mother of two girls and her rescue puppy. She loves to cook, travel and watch murder mysteries.

Eppiphanie Richardson

is an Atlanta native who decided to take on Nashville as her newest adventure. She is also the Associate Program Manager for the Be in the Zone-Turn Off Your Phone Campaign which educates teens and parents on the dangers of distracted driving. She has a passion for healthcare and serving others. She feels privileged to be able to serve Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt. In her free time, she enjoys exploring Nashville, dancing, running, and spending time with her husband and son.

Mimi Sanders

is a Nashville native and received her Masters from Vanderbilt University. She is the Associate Program Manager for the Kohls Seat Smart Program, which focuses on educating caregivers, children, and community partners on the importance of car seat safety. She is so excited to join the team at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt. In her free time, she enjoys volunteering with her local church’s special needs ministry, hanging out with family and friends, and doing yoga


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Resources from our generous partners
Tips about Car Seat Safety
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Tips from AllState
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Tips for Teens and Safe Driving
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This newsletter is brought to you by the Pediatric Trauma Injury Prevention Program and Kohl’s Stay Seat Smart Program at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

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