EEHDA September Newsletter
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Fall Garden Tour

A preview of the homes and parks on this year's East End Historical District Fall Garden Tour.

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President's Column

A monthly update from EEHDA President, Jeff Patterson.

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To read full story, click here.

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Meet Ryan Murray

EEHDA's newest board member

Q: How did you become interested in the East End?

Ryan: I became interested in the East End after my wife, Rachel, and I decided to call Galveston home. My wife works on island and I work in Houston, so we had to decide if we were going to live in Houston, Galveston or somewhere in the middle. Neither of us really wanted a suburban lifesytle, let alone a Houston suburban lifestyle. So we chose to live in Galveston and the choice was easy. I have always had an admiration for traditional building techniques, early American architecture, and a desire to own an historic home (a prospect which terrified us to a degree). This combined with the great walkability of the East End made the neighborhood the only place I would consider living in Galveston. This restricted home search criteria made for a lengthy search that drove my wife and realtor crazy, but the wait was worth it and we are very happy to call the East End home. 

Q: Tell me about your historic home?

Ryan: Rachel and I purchased a 1912 Edmund J. Cordray home. Originally built and appearing on property records as a rental property with Cordray as the owner. Cordray was a pharmacist and owned and operated the Cordray Drug Store once located at the site of the East End Cottage. The house was rented from 1919 to 1941 to a variety of tenants including the Alpha Kappa Kappa medical fraternity, a mechanic, a bookkeeper and a manager at the Galveston Piano Company. Cordray’s daughter Florence moved into the home in 1941 and lived here until 1985. Rachel and I purchased the home in 2016 and have been slowly rehabing and making it our own since. The home is a combination of Colonial Revival and Craftsman architecture. Its realitively open mainfloor, high ceilings and tons of natural light made this home a good fit for our growing family.

To read full story, click here.

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City Hall Update

A monthly update from David Collins, Councilman, District 3.

To read full story, click here.

Preservation 101

How to research the history of your historic Galveston home.

To read full story, click here.

EEHDA Upcoming Events

Make sure to mark these important dates on your calendar.

September 6
EEHDA Board Meeting

October 2
National Night Out
Hosted by Floyd & Sandy Pollock, 1200 Block of Sealy St.

October 4
EEHDA Board Meeting

October 6
East End Fall Garden Tour & Crafts Show
Contact

November 10
EEHDA Community Thanksgiving Dinner
Contact

November 30
East End Holiday Homes Tour

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East End Holiday Homes Tour

EEHDA's 29th Victorian Christmas Holiday Homes Tour will be from 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. on November 30th. The tour will feature four East End Historical District homes festively decorated for the holiday season. Additionally, the EEHDA Cottage will be open for light refreshments, and guests will enjoy a variety of holiday music at the EEHDA's Darragh Park and at some of the residential locations.

To read full story, click here.

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Six Blogs to Bookmark If You Live In A Historic Home

Need some inspiration in the ongoing effort to restore and then maintain a Victorian house? These six homeowners write about their restoration projects with humor, pain and pride. All are truly entertaining reads that provide valuable insight from reno-philes across the country.

1. Victoria Elizabeth Barnes

1. I’ll admit that this is one of my favorites. Victoria's motto is: “giant fancy things are cheaper than therapy.” She and her husband are restoring an 1890 Victorian outside of Philadelphia. What's wonderful about Victoria is her attitude-- she has lighthearted approach that helps her get through the more woeful aspects of renovating. In her words: “I have an affliction/ability to look at something long past fixing, and see what it once was. And if that thing was originally incredibly beautiful, it doesn’t matter what it looks like now.” 

Click here to read more.

2. Danville Experience

The (mis)adventures of a pediatric nurse practitioner and a corporate attorney as they roll up their sleeves and tackle the restoration of an 1874 Victorian Gothic mansion in Danville, Virginia. It's taken longer than expected--they are in the 15th year of a five-year renovation.
One favorite excerpt: “An old house has an enormous capacity for forgiveness, so long as it is truly loved in return. We all start out with very little knowledge and understanding of what takes to maintain and restore them.” 

Click here to read more.

3. Vivacious Victorian

Amy and Doug Heavily both have big jobs-,-she is a conductor and teacher and he is a software engineer. In their spare time, the couple is renovating what they lovingly refer to as their "forever home", the historic Murray Bryant House in Franklin, Ohio. Amy writes: "Doug and I started by falling in love with old houses, and not wanting to pay for things we thought we could do ourselves – I mean, if we failed, we could always call someone. I am the imagination, the drive, and the vision. He is the practicality, the sense, and the knowledge. It’s a great team."

Click here to read more.

4. Restoring Ross

What Ross MacTaggert calls "The Great Real Estate Search" began as a space issue. His business, a vintage light restoration company called The Old Above, was growing quickly and needed a home. Ross ended up with more space than he bargained when he fell in love with the 1894 Cross House, a  9,000 square foot home in Emporia, Kansas. Ross said he was “awestruck and mesmerized with a desperate, aching, yearning to be a part of its resurrection.” He writes about his ongoing project with great warmth and hope. 

Click here to read more.

5. My Queen Anne

When Rachel Meyerink first laid eyes on her 1889 Victorian in Sioux Falls, it was hiding behind a giant Weeping Willow and underneath two layers of siding and 1960s era additions. "One of the happiest moments of our restoration careers was uncovering the original columns and siding," she writes. Though it can be painful to read step-by-step. you know in the end, it will work out beautifully.

Click here to read more.

6. Farmhouse Reborn

After meeting in college, David and Lynne Sade married in 2011. Two years later, they found their dream home-- an 1850 farmhouse on five acres near Charlottesville, Virginia. But, there was a hitch in their happily ever after.  "Almost every single room will need moderate to major renovation," she writes. "The beauty of this problem is we have the opportunity to make the house our very own."

Click here to read more.

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Yard Of The Month

Congratulations to Ronna and Bob Stults at 1221 Winnie for having the “East End Yard of the Month” for September.

Even in the withering heat of the summer months, the Stults keep a pristine garden. It's always blooming. The front garden is picturesque and relaxing with water features and colors that stimulate the senses. 

Ronna finds gardening therapeutic and she is constantly trying new plants in the front and back yards since the couple bought their East End house nearly five years ago.

"I am by no means a horticulturist, but since moving to Galveston, we are learning what plants thrive and which do not. It is a constant learning experience,” she said.

The couple spends more time traveling in the summer, visiting family and escaping the heat, so it takes a lot of effort to keep the yard looking fresh. 

Ronna can often be found working in the yard, and Bob provides the help and support that she needs.

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Where In The East End Is This?

You will need to search the skyline behind some rapidly maturing oak trees to find this elaborate pinnacle: highly unusual for a residential building. 

Solution To August Mystery

The arched front door and windows, crowned by wooden pediments, open on to the front porch of the house at 1122 Sealy.

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4 Fun Things To Do In September

September 8

HISTORIC HURRICANES TALK

The Bryan Museum will host a series of interesting guests in the coming months including Stan Blazyk, Galveston’s unofficial weatherman, lifelong climate enthusiast, and author of A Century of Galveston Weather. Blazyk will discuss the resilience and response of Galvestonians to the 1900, 1915, and 1943 hurricanes, and Hurricanes Carla and Ike.

To find out more, click here.

September 22

19TH ANNUAL PAWS GALA

The theme for this popular party, which benefits the Galveston Island Humane Society, is CRUISIN' the PAW-ribbean and will feature special honoree Francisco "PACO" (aka PAWco) Vargas. Guests will enjoy open bar, a seated dinner, dancing and a silent auction. For information on sponsorships and to purchase tickets, call 409.740.1919.

To find out more, click here.

September 28-29

GALVESTON ISLAND SHRIMP FEST

Calling all foodies--celebrate local seafood at the Galveston Island Shrimp Festival, which will feature some of the best shrimp gumbo the Gulf Coast has to offer. Events include a Texas-size shrimp dinner, 5K, the Lil’ Shrimps Parade with festive floats, marching band and bead tossing, vendor exhibits, live music and gumbo cook-off. Visitors to the festival will be able to purchase a gumbo sampling cup in advance for $10.

To find out more, click here.

September 29

WYNONNA & THE BIG NOISE

Respected by millions of fans who are drawn to her music and undeniable talent, Wynonna Judd’s rich and commanding voice was dubbed by Rolling Stone as “the greatest female country singer since Patsy Cline.” Wynonna appears with her great backup band, The Big Noise, led by her husband/drummer/producer, Cactus Moser. Get ready for an evening filled with country, Americana, blues, soul and rock!

To find out more, click here.

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September Calendar

Find out what's happening this September in the East End and beyond.

To view or download the calendar, click here.

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Join EEHDA

Membership in the
East End Historical District
Association is easy and fun!
To find out more, click here.

Contacts & Questions

Find out who to contact about a streetlight outage, how to watch council meetings & more. 
To find out more, click here.

Advertise

Your advertising sponsorship not only helps support the East End neighborhood but it helps you reach an interested, engaged audience for your product or service. Newsletters are distributed to our members, new residents of the East End, city council members, managers of city departments, Galveston-area civic organizations as well as Galveston’s Rosenberg Library. Let us hear from you!
To find out more information, contact EEHDA President Jeff Patterson at 713.291.7043 or via email.

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East End Historical District Association

1501 Postoffice Street, Galveston
United States

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