Keeping you up to date with all the goings-on at TORCH

TORCH Newsletter Trinity Term

Weeks 7 & 8 (4 June – 17 June 2017)

The term has moved swiftly on and as it has, we have had a wonderfully active last few weeks. We hope you have enjoyed the many events, activities and discussions – certainly here at TORCH we have enjoyed hosting such a wide range of engaging interdisciplinary humanities activities.

Coming up over the next 2 weeks is the launch of the highly anticipated city-wide installation The 'Gaps Between’. The 'Gaps Between' Installation celebrates some of the often hidden and alternative stories of people of Oxford. Using prominent railings of Oxford buildings including the Sheldonian and Radcliffe Camera ‘Gaps Between’ will display images from 14 June onwards, that represent Oxford’s alternative, and often hidden, stories and will include photographs, images of artwork, pictures from archives as well as creative responses to these. The installation will be up for a month.

We will be rounding off our Book at Lunchtime series with a special event on Images of Mithra. For details on how to register, please see below.

We will be launching our Curriculum Diversity and Disability Series on 15 June with a launch event on ‘Diversifying the Curriculum: Disability Narratives and Histories’.

Finally, there are a number of research opportunities available which, as always, we encourage you to take a look at and apply for.

Highlighted Events

Diversifying the Curriculum: Disability Narratives and Histories

Thursday, June 15, 2017 - 12:30pm to 2:00pm
Seminar Room, Radcliffe Humanities, Woodstock Road, Oxford

This seminar will launch TORCH’s Disability and Curriculum Diversity series and foregrounds disability as a conceptual lens in narrative and social history. The lives of disabled people have often remained hidden in historical accounts of the Twentieth Century and cultural representation.

Professor Richard Sandell, University of Leicester, will speak on the role of museums in changing the way society perceives and understands disability and explore how the marked absence and invisibility of disabled people in museum and gallery exhibitions and interpretation can be overcome. Other panellists will include post-graduate, Helen Hillman, presenting her research on the 1920s Voluntary Sterilization Movement and the influence of its propaganda on conceptualising the ’mentally-disabled’ and campaigns to sterilize individuals thought to be ‘mentally deficient’. In doing so, this seminar will render visible the way disability is socially and culturally constructed and the imperative for the Activism and Agency of disabled people to be presented in cultural institutions. 

This event will be chaired by Dr Marie Tidball (Faculty of Law, University of Oxford).

Please click here for more information

News and Blogs

Professor Frank Guridy on 'Sport and the Black Freedom Struggle'

In this Voices Across Borders blog post, Marquis Palmer writes about this recent Race and Resistance Programme event. 

You can read the post in full here

The Adventures of John Blake: Mystery of the Ghost Ship

Dominic Davies, convener of the TORCH Network, ‘Comics and Graphic Novels: The Politics of Form’, reviews Philip Pullman and Fred Fordham’s new children’s comic, The Adventures of John Blake: Mystery of the Ghost Strip (2017).

Read the review in full here

Podcast: A Genre in Crisis: The Novel in 1940s France

The TORCH Crisis, Extremes, and Apocalypse network hosted a talk with Professor Ann Jefferson (French, University of Oxford) on 'A Genre in Crisis: The Novel in 1940s France'. The French novel has twice been deemed to be in crisis over the course of the 20th century, first from the 1890s to the 1920s and then during the 1940s. In this talk Jefferson explored what factors were at stake in this extreme-sounding diagnosis of a literary genre.

You can listen to the podcast here.

Podcast: Gandhi, Sacrifice and the Ambiguities of Non-Violence

TORCH's Crisis, Extremes, and Apocalypse network hosted a seminar on the topic of sacrifice. This involved a revisitation of the concept of Sacrifice in late modernity in its various configurations, philosophical and ideological.

In this talk, Faisal Devji (Oxford) looked at ‘Gandhi, Sacrifice and the Ambiguities of non-violence’.

You can listen to the podcast here

New Opportunities

Knowledge Exchange Fellowships

Proposals are sought from Oxford researchers to facilitate new, or develop existing, relationships with external partners that further the reach and significance of research in all humanities disciplines at Oxford. The range of possible knowledge exchange activities and partners is deliberately broad; it is up to the applicant to make the case that what is proposed enhances their research, benefits the external partner(s), and has the potential to continue after the end of the Fellowship. All previous fellows have project descriptions on the TORCH website here: http://torch.ox.ac.uk/knowledge-exchange

Up to £10k is available to support each fellow.

Deadline Thursday 29 June 2017. 

Mellon 'Global South' Visiting Fellowships

TORCH is looking for applications from University of Oxford Humanities academics to host a visiting ‘Global South’ Fellowship during 2017 or 2018. 

These visiting fellowships cover travel, accommodation and hosting while the visiting speakers carry out a series of public events, student/graduate seminars and drop-in discussions, also including, if they wish, filming and live web-streaming.

We aim to appoint up to two Visiting Fellowships, per year (2017-18), in both cases from the Global South, broadly defined, and from across humanities subjects. We welcome suggestions for appointees from academics from all the Humanities Faculties at Oxford and are interested in world-leading individuals who both study and represent diversity, and who also have practical experience in promoting diversity in his/her university and country.

We will welcome participation from Visitors in our TORCH networks and programmes, including ‘Women in the Humanities’, ‘Medical Humanities’, and ‘Race and Resistance’. We will seek applications specifically from institutions in the Global South, including from India, Pakistan, Malaysia, Philippines, Mauritius, Nigeria, Ghana, Kenya, Tanzania, and across Southern Africa and the Caribbean.

The Mellon Global South Visiting Fellowships will be crucial in the work of providing role models and embedding expectations on diversity and inclusivity in the wider University. 

Applications should include a 4 page max CV for the proposed individual and a research outline explaining their contribution to your Faculty (teaching and research) in no more than 1000 words. Click here for details. 

Deadline 26 June 2017 

Mellon 'Global South' Visiting Professorships

TORCH is looking for applications from University of Oxford humanities academics to host a visiting ‘Global South’ Professorship during 2017 or 2018. 

These visiting professorships cover travel, accommodation and hosting while the visiting speakers carry out a series of public events, student/graduate seminars and drop-in discussions, also including, if they wish, filming and live web-streaming.

We aim to appoint up to two Visiting Professorships, per year (2017-18), in both cases from the Global South, broadly defined, and from across humanities subjects. We welcome suggestions for appointees from academics from all the Humanities Faculties at Oxford and are interested in world-leading individuals who both study and represent diversity, and who also have practical experience in promoting diversity in his/her university and country.

The Mellon ‘Global South’ Visiting Professorships and Fellowships will run May-June, or October-November, that is to say, in term. We will seek applications specifically from institutions in the Global South, including from India, Pakistan, Malaysia, Philippines, Mauritius, Nigeria, Ghana, Kenya, Tanzania, and across Southern Africa and the Caribbean.

The Mellon Global South Professorships together with the Mellon Global South Visiting Fellowships will be crucial in the work of providing role models and embedding expectations on diversity and inclusivity in the wider University. 

Applications should include a 4 page max CV for the proposed individual and a research outline explaining their contribution to your Faculty (teaching and research) in no more than 1000 words.Click here for details.

Deadline 26 June 2017.

Mellon 'Humanities & Identities' Workshop and Conference Funding

£500-£1000 sums available for conferences and workshops 

We welcome proposals from researchers in the humanities for workshops/conferences relating to the headline theme ‘Humanities & Identities’, funded by the VC Diversity Fund and the Andrew W Mellon Foundation.

The series will focus on multiple research areas relating to diversity including race, gender, sexuality, disability, poverty, class, religion and inequality. Deadline 26 June 2017.

TORCH Oxford Medieval Studies Small Grants

The TORCH Oxford Medieval Studies Programme invites applications for small grants to support conferences, workshops, and other forms of collaborative research activity organised by students at postgraduate (whether MSt or DPhil) or early career level from across the Humanities Division at the University of Oxford.

The activity should take place in Oxford at any time between November 2017 and February 2018. The closing date for applications is Friday of Week 7 of Trinity Term (9 June 2017).

Upcoming Events

Book at Lunchtime: Images of Mithra

Wednesday, June 7, 2017 - 12:30pm to 2:00pm
Seminar Room, Radcliffe Humanities, Woodstock Road, Oxford

‘Images of Mithra‘, is the first in a new series of works, ‘Visual Conversations’ that aims to tackle a variety of questions about the study of material culture and religion. With a history of use extending back to Vedic texts of the second millennium BC, derivations of the name Mithra appear in the Roman Empire, across Sasanian Persia, and in the Kushan Empire of southern Afghanistan and northern India during the first millennium AD. Even today, this name has a place in Yazidi and Zoroastrian religion. But what connection have Mihr in Persia, Miiro in Kushan Bactria, and Mithras in the Roman Empire to one another?

Over the course of the volume, specialists in the material culture of these diverse regions explore appearances of the name Mithra from six distinct locations in antiquity. Co-author Dominic Dalglish (Archaeology, University of Oxford) joins an expert panel to discuss the book and its themes.

There will be an opportunity for attendees to discuss the book with the panellists over tea and coffee after the event.

To register, click here

Part of Book at Lunchtime, a fortnightly series of bite size book discussions, with commentators from a range of disciplines. 

Please click here for more information

In the Name of Women's Rights: The Rise of Femonationalism

Wednesday, June 7, 2017 - 5:00pm
Garden Room, Stanford House, 65 High Street, Oxford

This new seminar series from TORCH's Long History of Identity, Ethnicity, and Nationhood reconsiders broad themes in ethnicity and nationalism studies through interdisciplinary and comparative discussion, drawing on wide examples across time and place.

In her presentation Sara Farris will discuss some of the themes laid out in her new book, In the Name of Women's Rights. The Rise of Femonationalism (Duke 2017). Farris' book explores the ways in which feminist ideas are often exploited by anti-Islam and xenophobic campaigns. She coins the term ‘femonationalism’ to describe the practise and claims that, by characterising Muslim men as oppressors and by emphasising the need to rescue Muslim women, these anti-Islam groups use gender equality to justify their prejudice.

Please click here for more information

Mark Lawson on Interviews

Tuesday, June 6, 2017 - 5:30pm to 7:00pm
Haldane Room, Wolfson College, Linton Rd, Oxford OX2 6UD

The Oxford Centre for Life-Writing is hosting a ‘meta interview’: critic and biographer Professor Dame Hermione Lee and arts journalist and broadcaster Mark Lawson about the art and method of the interview.

Please click here for more information

Putting Aristotle in His Place: Philosophy as Heresy in the Thirteenth Century

Tuesday, June 13, 2017 - 5:00pm
Taylor Institute, Oxford

The Oxford Medieval Studies Programme is hosting this seminar on "Putting Aristotle in His Place: Philosophy as Heresy in the Thirteenth Century" with Dr Ann Giletti (Faculty of Theology and Religion, University of Oxford).

This event is open to all. 

Please click here for more information

War, Health and Humanitarianism

Friday, June 16, 2017 - 11:00am to 5:30pm
Lecture Theatre, Weston Library, Oxford, OX1 3BG

‘War, Health and Humanitarianism’ brings together historians studying conflicts from the medieval period to the modern world in order to discuss the potential impact of historical research on present day policy.

Looking at conflicts from the medieval period to the twentieth century, this symposium discusses humanitarian interventions which seek to mitigate the suffering in war of both combatants and civilians. What motivates humanitarian actors and organizations, like the Red Cross and Oxfam? How effective are they? What defines humanitarianism in a world of nation states?

Convened by Dr Rosemary Wall (University of Hull, and Sassoon Visiting Fellow at the Bodleian Libraries).

All welcome. Refreshments provided.

Click here to register. 

Please click here for more information

Looking back

As we move swiftly through the new academic year, we look back at some of our past highlights. 

The Remedy: Hinduism

In this episode, Naomi Richman interviews Matthew Martin (Oxford) whose work focuses on Hindu traditions. They discuss the great variety of Hindu approaches to healing, from ayuverda to yoga and deliverance from evil spirits.

This series explores different religious and secular approaches to healing. In each episode, Naomi Richman (Oxford) interviews a representative from a religious or secular movement to find out how their perspectives influence their attitudes to health and modern medicine. Through these conversations, we reveal what ancient truths can assist us in our contemporary search for well-being, from ayuverda to transhumanism. This project was generously supported by The Oxford Research Centre for the Humanities (TORCH) and was initially produced in celebration of Radio Brockley's 50th anniversary, London's longest running hospital radio station based at the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital.

Watch here

Thinking with Literature

Terence Cave, professor of French Literature and the author of Thinking with Literature, discusses the cognitive function of literature and its creation of new ways of thinking; with contributions from Ilona Roth (Senior Lecturer in Psychology, Open University), Marina Warner (Weidenfeld Professor of Comparative European Literature, St Anne's College, University of Oxford), and Deirdre Wilson (Emeritus Professor of Linguistics, UCL).

Watch here

Events Calendar, Weeks 7-8

Monday 5 June

9:00 | SYMPOSIUM AND CFA: MEDICAL ETHICS EDUCATION AFTER MEDICAL SCHOOL

Symposium

17:00 – 19:00 | BETWEEN HISTORIOGRAPHY AND LITERATURE: "GERSHOM SHOLEM'S INTELLECTUAL BIOGRAPHY."

Speaker: Amir Engel 

Tuesday 6 June 

10:00 | FRANCE AND BRITAIN IN THE AGE OF REVOLUTION: ROME V CARTHAGE?

Part of the 'Brexit in Historical Perspective' Series

12:30 – 14:00 | HOW DO WE DO ART HISTORY?

Photographs and Glass Slides in the Visual Resources Centre

13:00 – 19:00 | WORKSHOP ON CRISES OF MEANING AND POLITICAL THEOLOGY

Workshop: Speakers include: Carolin Duttlinger, Hjalmar Falk and many more

17:30 – 19:00 | MARK LAWSON ON INTERVIEWS

With Professor Dame Hermione Lee

17:30 – 18:30 | A FAMILY CULTURE OF CREATIVITY: 'MEMORANDA OF THE BURNEY FAMILY'

Lecture by Lorna J. Clark (Carleton University, and Royal Bank of Canada Foundation Fellow at the Bodleian Libraries)

18:00 | LANGUAGE AND THE PROBLEM OF FEMALE AUTHORITY

Speaker: Professor Deborah Cameron 

18:15 | ILLUSTRATING THE PSALMS

Speaker: Roger Wagner

Wednesday 7 June

12:00 – 17:00 | CRITICAL VISUALIZATION CONCLUSIONS WORKSHOP

A TORCH Critical Visualization Network event

12:30 – 14:00 | IMAGES OF MITHRA

Book at Lunchtime event

13:00 – 14:30 | TORCH FICTION AND HUMAN RIGHTS NETWORK

Storytelling and the Law 

15:00 – 16:30 | DESTINATIONS WITH A DPHIL

Entrepreneurship - Lisa Drakeman

17:00 | IN THE NAME OF WOMEN'S RIGHTS: THE RISE OF FEMONATIONALISM

Speaker: Sara Farris (Goldsmiths, London)

17:30 – 19:00 | TIME TRIBES: HOW THE RAILWAYS MADE COMMUNITIES (1840-1900)

Speaker: Professor Oliver Zimmer

19:30 – 20:30 | ‘SET IN STONE’: CONSTRUCTING CHRISTIANITY IN THE ANGLO-SAXON CRYPTS OF HEXHAM AND RIPON

Speaker: Meg Boulton

Thursday 8 June

11:00 – 16:00 | HERITAGE: REBUILDING THE FUTURE FROM THE PAST

Workshop showcasing recent Oxford research

11:00 – 16:00 | HERITAGE: REBUILDING THE FUTURE FROM THE PAST

Rebuilding the Future from the Past 

16:00 – 17:30 | ENEMY RULE

Seeing the First World War Through the Lens of Military Occupations 

17:00 – 19:00 | GREAT WRITERS INSPIRE AT HOME: AMINATTA FORNA

Part of the Postcolonial Writing and Theory seminar series Trinity Term 2017

Friday 9 June 

13:00 – 14:30 | HEIDEGGER READING GROUP

Discussing “What Calls for Thinking?” 

14:00 – 16:00 | THE PRAECOX FEELING

Seminar run by TORCH Oxford Phenomenology Network 

17:00 | ANGLO-NORMAN READING GROUP TT 2017

Collaborative forum in which to read, translate, and discuss Anglo-Norman texts

Saturday 10 June

9:30 – 18:45 | THE APPENDIX VERGILIANA AND ITS RECEPTION

1-day conference

Monday 12 June

12:45 – 14:00 | OCCT DISCUSSION GROUP: READING OUT OF CONTEXT

Discussion Group

17:00 | HOW THE MOUSE LOST ITS TAIL, OR, LAMARCK'S DANGEROUS IDEA

Talk given by Jessica Riskin (University of Stanford)

Tuesday 13 June

ALL DAY: RETHINKING CRISIS

Early career conference

10:00 | ENGLISH EXCEPTIONALISM AND THE ROAD TO BREXIT 2016

Part of the 'Brexit in Historical Perspective' Series

11:30 – 13:00 | MARKETING THE MEDIEVAL

Women Art Workers, Professional Identity, and the Arts and Crafts Movement in Britain

12:30 – 14:00 | THE EPISTOLARY CONSTRUCTION OF CHRISTIAN FRIENDSHIPS

A talk entitled ‘“from benevolent hearts & polish’d able pens what may not be hop’d for?”: The Epistolary Construction of Christian Friendships. Speaker: Tessa Whitehouse

17:00 | PUTTING ARISTOTLE IN HIS PLACE: PHILOSOPHY AS HERESY IN THE THIRTEENTH CENTURY

Oxford Medieval Studies seminar

Wednesday 14 June 

13:00 – 14:00 | SITARAH MADE FOR THE MOSQUE OF THE PROPHET IN MEDINA

Part of the Reading Images Seminar Series TT 2017

Thursday 15 June

12:15 – 17:30 | HERITAGE PATHWAY

Demons Land at National Trust Stowe

12:30 – 14:00 | DIVERSIFYING THE CURRICULUM: DISABILITY NARRATIVES AND HISTORIES

Launch event 

16:00 – 18:00 | VARIETIES OF HISTORY

Part of the 'We Stand with CEU: New Directions in History' Series

16:00 – 17:30 | THE WARTIME HUNT FOR TRAITORS AND THE FUTURE OF AUSTRIA-HUNGARY

Speaker: Professor Mark Cornwall (University of Southampton/All Soul's) 

17:00 – 19:00 | GREAT WRITERS INSPIRE AT HOME: EDITORS AND CONTRIBUTORS, THE CAMBRIDGE HISTORYOF BLACK AND ASIAN BRITISH WRITING

Part of the Postcolonial Writing and Theory seminar series Trinity Term 2017

Friday 16 June

9:30 – 16:30 | PSYCHOPATHOLOGY OF TIME AND BODY

One-day workshop

10:00 – 20:30 | TRANSLATION INTO THEATRE AND THE SOCIAL SCIENCES

Supported by the TORCH Oxford Comparative Criticism and Translation programme

10:00 – 16:30 | DIGITAL LEARNING IN MUSEUMS

Partnership Event from the Oxford University Museums Partnership and the Digital Learning Network

11:00 – 17:30 | WAR, HEALTH, AND HUMANITARIANISM

Supported by the Society for the Social History of Medicine, All Souls College and the Bodleian Librarie 

12:30 – 13:45 | STEERING GROUP MEETING

TORCH Race and Resistance programme

13:00 – 14:30 | HEIDEGGER READING GROUP

Discussing “What Calls for Thinking?” 

Saturday 17 June

ALL DAY: WOMEN, AUTHORSHIP, AND IDENTITY IN THE LONG EIGHTEENTH CENTURY: NEW METHODOLOGIES

Speaker: Susanne Kord (UCL)

9:00 – 18:30 | TRANSLATION INTO THEATRE AND THE SOCIAL SCIENCES

Supported by the TORCH Oxford Comparative Criticism and Translation programme

12:00 – 14:00 | HOW DO MENTALLY ILL PEOPLE EXPERIENCE TIME?

European Philosophy Forum

 

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Radcliffe Humanities, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Woodstock Road, Oxford, OX2 6GG

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