Keeping you up to date with all the goings-on at TORCH

TORCH Newsletter Trinity Term

Weeks 9 & 10 (18 June – 1 July 2017)

The term has come to a close but here at TORCH there is still a whole host of events, activities and initiatives for you to get involved in.

The first of these is the stunning 'Gaps Between' Installation, which we are delighted to announce went live on Wednesday 14 June. The 'Gaps Between' features images of some of the lesser known - but no less important - people in Oxford's history that are being displayed on some of Oxford's most well-known buildings. Figures include: Merze Tate, the first African American woman to graduate from the University of Oxford, Malcolm X who was invited to speak at the Oxford Union in 1964, and Marie Tidball who is a Research Associate at the University and disability rights campaigner. We welcome you to take a walk around the city and view the images that will be displayed until 14 July 2017. To view a map of the installation, please click here. We welcome all your thoughts and ideas in response to the exhibition and encourage you to Tweet about them at @TORCHOxford using #GapsBetween.

On Thursday 15 June, we launched the TORCH Disability and Curriculum Diversity series. ‘Disability Narratives and Histories’ was the first of 5 seminars which will look at how we understand disability, autonomy and the colonisation of the body, and more. Keep an eye on the TORCH Newsletter for details of future seminars.

Finally, we are pleased to announce Ruth Ramsden-Karelse has been awarded the Stuart Hall Foundation Doctoral Scholarship. The scholarship, in association with Merton College and TORCH, will support Ruth's DPhil project on drag performance in Cape Coloured communities since 1950. By considering the role drag plays in the construction of borders and in the transgression necessary to their constitution, Ruth's research aims to contribute to theories concerning the intersections of sexuality and gender with nationalisms. For more on Ruth’s work, please click here.

This is the last Newsletter of the term however, we will keep our website up to date with summer events. Click here for news on the latest events and activities.

Highlighted Events

Mobility and Space in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe

Friday, June 23, 2017 (All day) to Saturday, June 24, 2017 (All day)
Radcliffe Humanities, Woodstock Road, Oxford, OX2 6GG

The application of spatial paradigms to the study of late medieval and early modern societies is now well underway. In contrast, the so-called ‘mobility turn’ has struggled to find its way from the social sciences to the humanities and particularly to disciplines concerned with the study of the past. This conference proposes to bring the two together by exploring how everyday mobility contributed to the shaping of late medieval and early modern spaces, and how spatial frameworks affected the movement of people in pre-modern Europe.

In focusing on these issues, the conference also intends to relate to current social challenges. The world is now more mobile than ever, yet it is often argued that more spatial boundaries exist today than ever before. The conference hopes to reflect on this contemporary paradox by exploring the long-term history of the tension between the dynamism of communities, groups and individuals, and the human construction of spaces and borders.

The conference brings together both early-career and more established scholars from six humanities disciplines and over a dozen different countries. It features a total of 20 papers and 2 keynote speeches, which will be given by Dr Mario Damen (University of Amsterdam) and Dr Rosa Salzberg (University of Warwick). To view the full programme, please visit https://mobilityandspace.wordpress.com

Click here to register for your ticket by 17 June.

This conference is in association with TORCH Oxford Medieval Studies programme. 

Please click here for more information

News and Blogs

Lest We Forget

Back in 2008, Oxford University launched The Great War Archive, a mass-digitisation project that successfully gathered over 6,500 materials relating to the First World War held by the general public. Building on from this success, Lest We Forget is a brand new initiative to save as many more pictures, letters and memories as possible through community-based collection days across the country. We are currently seeking to raise £80,000 to fund training days for local volunteers, acquire equipment, and offer outreach events.

Building on from the success of the ‘Great War Archive’ in 2008, a mass-digitisation project that attracted the direct submission of over 6,500 items (now available online), we want to go even further and rescue the many remaining traces of the war in attics, drawers, and cupboards in homes across the UK still waiting to be uncovered.

With the loss of all veterans of 1914-1918, and the rapid fading of those years from living memory, this campaign provides one final effort to ensure that as much material as possible is saved for posterity before it’s too late. These centenary years have provided an important impetus for a renewed interest in the generation that fought the conflict, but we want to ensure that memory lives on beyond 2018.

Every item collected will then be published in 2018 on a free-to-use online database for children, scholars, and the wider public alike to promote understanding of the Great War, further historical research, and secure the stories of those who lived through it.

The Lest We Forget crowdfunding site is live to raise the £80,000 required for training days, outreach activities, and equipment.

Any donation, no matter how small, is welcome. For more information and details on how to donate, please click here

Oxford-Weidenfeld Translation Prize 2017

The Oxford-Weidenfeld Prize is for book-length literary translations into English from any living European language. It aims to honour the craft of translation, and to recognise its cultural importance. It is founded by Lord Weidenfeld and funded by New College, The Queen’s College and St Anne’s College, Oxford.

The winner of the 2017 Oxford-Weidenfeld Translation Prize was announced at the prizegiving and dinner at St Anne’s College, Oxford on Saturday 3 June. This was the crowning event of Oxford Translation Day, which boasted a varied programme of talks, workshops and readings.

Frank Perry won the 2017 Prize for his excellent translation of Lina Wolff's Bret Easton Ellis and the Other Dogs (And Other Stories).

For more information and to see the other shortlisted candidates, please click here

Video: Britain's History and Memory of Transatlantic Slavery

Transatlantic slavery, just like the abolition movements, affected every space and community in Britain, from Cornwall to the Clyde, from dockyard alehouses to country estates. Today, its financial, architectural and societal legacies remain, scattered across the country in museums and memorials, philanthropic institutions and civic buildings, empty spaces and unmarked graves. Just as they did in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, British people continue to make sense of this ‘national sin’ by looking close to home, drawing on local histories and myths to negotiate their relationship to the distant horrors of the ‘Middle Passage’, and the Caribbean plantation. This collection brings together localised case studies of Britain’s history and memory of its involvement in the transatlantic slave trade, and slavery. Co-editor Ryan Hanley (History, University of Oxford) joined an expert panel to discuss these essays, ranging in focus from eighteenth-century Liverpool to twenty-first-century rural Cambridgeshire, from racist ideologues to Methodist preachers, examining how transatlantic slavery impacted on, and continues to impact, people and places across Britain.

Watch the video here

Part of Book at Lunchtime, a fortnightly series of bite sized book discussions, with commentators from a range of disciplines. 

Negotiated Texts Network Seminar

Since the launch of The Oxford Research Centre in Humanities’ (TORCH) Negotiated Texts Network in Pembroke College on International Women’s Day 2017, The Quill project have committed to putting on several termly events exploring different facets of negotiated texts and digital humanities. The first event of Trinity term took place on Monday, May 8th, with a seminar that continued a theme initiated in the Network’s launch in March and provided an opportunity for people working on the records of formal negotiations to discuss opportunities for future collaboration and fresh insights on existing research. These opportunities were explored in the talks given by two guest speakers, from Dr Meghan Campbell, Deputy-Director of the Oxford Human Rights Hub, presenting on the gaps revealed by the drafting process of CEDAW, and Dr Martin Poulter, Wikimedian In Residence for the University of Oxford, presenting on the wiki-based platforms and the potential for collaboration with open data sets.

Read more about the Negotiated Texts Network's seminar in this blog post here.

New Opportunities

Knowledge Exchange Fellowships

Proposals are sought from Oxford researchers to facilitate new, or develop existing, relationships with external partners that further the reach and significance of research in all humanities disciplines at Oxford. The range of possible knowledge exchange activities and partners is deliberately broad; it is up to the applicant to make the case that what is proposed enhances their research, benefits the external partner(s), and has the potential to continue after the end of the Fellowship. All previous fellows have project descriptions on the TORCH website here: http://torch.ox.ac.uk/knowledge-exchange

Up to £10k is available to support each fellow.

Deadline Thursday 29 June 2017. 

Mellon 'Global South' Visiting Fellowships

TORCH is looking for applications from University of Oxford Humanities academics to host a visiting ‘Global South’ Fellowship during 2017 or 2018. 

These visiting fellowships cover travel, accommodation and hosting while the visiting speakers carry out a series of public events, student/graduate seminars and drop-in discussions, also including, if they wish, filming and live web-streaming.

We aim to appoint up to two Visiting Fellowships, per year (2017-18), in both cases from the Global South, broadly defined, and from across humanities subjects. We welcome suggestions for appointees from academics from all the Humanities Faculties at Oxford and are interested in world-leading individuals who both study and represent diversity, and who also have practical experience in promoting diversity in his/her university and country.

We will welcome participation from Visitors in our TORCH networks and programmes, including ‘Women in the Humanities’, ‘Medical Humanities’, and ‘Race and Resistance’. We will seek applications specifically from institutions in the Global South, including from India, Pakistan, Malaysia, Philippines, Mauritius, Nigeria, Ghana, Kenya, Tanzania, and across Southern Africa and the Caribbean.

The Mellon Global South Visiting Fellowships will be crucial in the work of providing role models and embedding expectations on diversity and inclusivity in the wider University. 

Applications should include a 4 page max CV for the proposed individual and a research outline explaining their contribution to your Faculty (teaching and research) in no more than 1000 words. Click here for details. 

Deadline 26 June 2017 

Mellon 'Global South' Visiting Professorships

TORCH is looking for applications from University of Oxford humanities academics to host a visiting ‘Global South’ Professorship during 2017 or 2018. 

These visiting professorships cover travel, accommodation and hosting while the visiting speakers carry out a series of public events, student/graduate seminars and drop-in discussions, also including, if they wish, filming and live web-streaming.

We aim to appoint up to two Visiting Professorships, per year (2017-18), in both cases from the Global South, broadly defined, and from across humanities subjects. We welcome suggestions for appointees from academics from all the Humanities Faculties at Oxford and are interested in world-leading individuals who both study and represent diversity, and who also have practical experience in promoting diversity in his/her university and country.

The Mellon ‘Global South’ Visiting Professorships and Fellowships will run May-June, or October-November, that is to say, in term. We will seek applications specifically from institutions in the Global South, including from India, Pakistan, Malaysia, Philippines, Mauritius, Nigeria, Ghana, Kenya, Tanzania, and across Southern Africa and the Caribbean.

The Mellon Global South Professorships together with the Mellon Global South Visiting Fellowships will be crucial in the work of providing role models and embedding expectations on diversity and inclusivity in the wider University. 

Applications should include a 4 page max CV for the proposed individual and a research outline explaining their contribution to your Faculty (teaching and research) in no more than 1000 words.Click here for details.

Deadline 26 June 2017.

Mellon 'Humanities & Identities' Workshop and Conference Funding

£500-£1000 sums available for conferences and workshops 

We welcome proposals from researchers in the humanities for workshops/conferences relating to the headline theme ‘Humanities & Identities’, funded by the VC Diversity Fund and the Andrew W Mellon Foundation.

The series will focus on multiple research areas relating to diversity including race, gender, sexuality, disability, poverty, class, religion and inequality. Deadline 26 June 2017.

Africa- Oxford (AfOx) Travel Grants

Africa- Oxford (AfOx) travel grants support the establishment of new collaborations between Africa and Oxford for research or teaching. AfOx is a cross university platform to support the development of equitable collaborations in research and teaching between staff at African institutions and collaborators in Oxford.

AfOx travel grants supports visits between potential collaborators in African institutions and their colleagues in Oxford, with a view to developing new collaborations around research or teaching. Applications are open to any discipline within the University.

The grant can be used to cover costs of travel (in either direction i.e. Oxford staff to an African institution or vice versa), accommodation and incidental expenses to a maximum of £5000 (it is anticipated that visits in general will be for periods between 1-8 weeks). Applications are made jointly between a member of staff at Oxford and a potential collaborator in an African institution (the travel award may cover more than two people and additional individuals should be named under purpose of the grant). The overarching aim of the scheme is to foster the development of new collaborations and the scheme is not intended to be used as alternative support for already established collaborations.

Digital Content and Communications Placement
Historic Royal Palaces (HRP), and the University of Oxford, are looking to recruit up to five D.Phil researchers to produce engaging digital content to support a major international conference in October 2017. The successful candidates will benefit from extensive training from HRP and the opportunity to built international networks. For further details and the Job Description, please click here. Deadline 19 June 2017.

Upcoming Events

Documenting Trauma: Comics and the Politics of Memory

Thursday, June 22, 2017 (All day)
Seminar Room, Radcliffe Humanities, Woodstock Road, Oxford, OX2 6GG

The TORCH Comics and Graphic Novels network are hosting a symposium on ‘Documenting Trauma: Comics and the Politics of Memory’. In the graphic novel Waltz with Bashir (2009), adapted from Ari Folman and David Polonsky’s 2008 animated film, the traumatised protagonist attempts to come to terms with his personal experience of the massacres at the Sabra and Shatila refugee camps during the Israeli invasion of Lebanon in the 1980s. In so doing, he seeks help from a psychologist, who informs him that ‘Memory is dynamic. If details are missing and there are some black holes, memory fills in the empty spaces until it completely “recalls” something that never happened’ (p.17).

Beginning with a talk from comics artist Nicola Streeten, and concluding with a keynote from Professor Hillary Chute, this symposium will seek to address the following questions: why have so many comics and other graphic narratives, the production and publication of which has exploded in recent years, been framed as memoirs or non-fictional documentaries of traumatic events? Is there a relationship between the comics form, as distinct from film and written narrative through its inclusion of multiple visual panels, and the remembrance and recovery of trauma? How do the interpretive demands made by these disjointed formal attributes impinge on readers of comics and shape their relationship to historical traumatic events?

Please click here for more information

Great Writers Inspire at Home: M. Nourbese Philip

Monday, June 26, 2017 - 5:00pm to 7:00pm
Seminar Room, Radcliffe Humanities, Woodstock Road, Oxford, OX2 6GG

M. NourbeSe Philip is a poet, novelist and lawyer, born in Tobago but now based in Canada. Though Philip does not have direct ties to Britain, her concerns with language, the past, and the question of how we belong, links her to many of the other writers who appear in the series. She will be in a panel discussion with Marina Warner, Matthew Reynolds and Elleke Boehmer.

Reserve your place here

Please click here for more information

Brazilian Samba and African Drumming

Sunday, June 25, 2017 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm
Magdalen College School, Cowley Pl, Oxford OX4 1DZ

The universal appeal of Brazilian Samba ensures that every participant will find the workshop accessible. From complete musical novice to professional musician, everyone will enjoy getting involved in creating infectious grooves and foot tapping rhythms!

This event is part of the Oxford Festival of the Arts 2017

Please click here for more information

Two-Way Tickets: Travel, Home, and War

Tuesday, June 20, 2017 (All day)
Wolfson College, Linton Rd, Oxford OX2 6UD

War necessitates travel: soldiers on active duty are ‘mobilised’, and so in a different sense are the people that war has displaced or made homeless. From the peripli of classical antiquity to the Grand Tour, from ethnographic and imperialist expeditions to postcolonial travel, the dialectic of home and abroad, foreign and native, is typically scrutinised through the experience of mobility, and further tested by the question of the return home. Not everybody has a ‘two-way ticket’ when it comes to war, but the industry around war tourism might indicate what war-related travel brings home, and its involvement in the construction of national and group identities.

This interdisciplinary conference asks how the concept of home is reassessed through travel generated by war. It invites debate around the ways travel precipitates or disrupts the construction of identity, against the backdrop of war. How do travelogues and literary fiction, fine art and film, museums and battlegrounds stage the encounter between home and the unheimlich? The conference welcomes papers from across all periods and fields, which might include literary studies, art history, film, gender, history, anthropology, psychology and media studies.

'Two-Way Tickets: Travel, Home, and War' is an interdisciplinary conference supported by TORCH through the 'Humanities & Identities' Conference and Workshop award.

Please click here for more information

Looking back

As we move swiftly through the new academic year, we look back at some of our past highlights. 

Collaborative Decision Making

Dr Mahima Mitra (Research Officer, Management in Medicine, Green Templeton College, University of Oxford) discusses collaborative decision making in healthcare as part of an event organised by Oxford Healthcare Values Partnership.

Watch here

Book at Lunchtime: Arcadia

The Arcadia App is one of the most substantial and interesting works of interactive fiction released last year” begins Emily Short. In this Book at Lunchtime event for the TORCH Humanities in the Digital Age series, the writer Iain Pears, with the academic Sophie Ratcliffe and cross-media authors Alex Butterworth, Emily Short and Richard Beard, discussed his new novel, Arcadia, which takes the form of a print book and an interactive app: offering a range of ways into an adventure story set in 1960s Oxford and the fantasy Anterworld.

In this video, the panel talks about the book’s place within a growing corpus of hypertext and digital forms of fiction which are allowing writers to experiment with narrative and narrators, ideas of time, world-building, the experience of reading, and the role of the reader.

Watch here

Events Calendar, Weeks 9-10

Tuesday 20 June

ALL DAY | TWO-WAY TICKETS

Travel, Home, and War

16:00 | HISTORY OF ANCIENT SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND MEDICINE

For those interested in contributing to postgraduate modules

19:30 – 22:00 | THE CONTAGION CABARET

Wednesday 21 June

ALL DAY | INKFISH

A Comics Workshop co-hosted by the TORCH Comics Network and Oxford Writers’ House

10:00 – 17:00 | INKFISH, A COMICS CREATION WORKSHOP

Workshop

Thursday 22 June

ALL DAY | DOCUMENTING TRAUMA: COMICS AND THE POLITICS OF MEMORY

A symposium hosted by the TORCH Network 'Comics and Graphic Novels: The Politics of Form'

10:00 – 19:00 | DOCUMENTING TRAUMA: COMICS AND THE POLITICS OF MEMORY’

TORCH Comics Symposium

Friday 23 June

ALL DAY | MOBILITY AND SPACE IN LATE MEDIEVAL AND EARLY MODERN EUROPE

Conference supported by Oxford Medieval Studies

10:00 - 12:30 | UNFLATTENING

Speaker: Nick Sousanis

Saturday 24 June

ALL DAY | DIVIDED CITIES

Culture, Infrastructure and the Urban Future

ALL DAY | MOBILITY AND SPACE IN LATE MEDIEVAL AND EARLY MODERN EUROPE

Conference supported by Oxford Medieval Studies

20:00 – 21:00 | STORMING UTOPIA

A theatrical experiment part of The Oxford Festival of the Arts

Sunday 25 June

13:00 – 14:00 | BRAZILIAN SAMBA AND AFRICAN DRUMMING

Workshop

18:00 – 19:00 | FROM VENICE TO VENEZUELA: UTOPIA AND ITS TRAVELS

Speakers: Professor Wes Williams and Professor Richard Scholar

Monday 26 June

17:00 – 19:00 | GREAT WRITERS INSPIRE AT HOME: M. NOURBESE PHILIP

Part of the Postcolonial Writing and Theory seminar series Trinity Term 2017

Tuesday 27 June

ALL DAY | ACCOUNTS OF ILLNESS IN HISTORICAL AND MODERN TEXTS

Exploring Methods in Medical Humanities Research Across Discplines

Wednesday 28 June

ALL DAY | AFTER CHICHELE

Intellectual and Cultural Dynamics of the English Church, 1443-1517

18:00 - 19:30 | SET UP FOR LIFE?

A panel discussion. Speakers: Edward Harcourt, Jeremy Holmes, Jen Lexmond and Ilina Singh

Thursday 29 June

ALL DAY | AFTER CHICHELE

Intellectual and Cultural Dynamics of the English Church, 1443-1517

Friday 30 June

ALL DAY | AFTER CHICHELE

Intellectual and Cultural Dynamics of the English Church, 1443-1517

ALL DAY | THE NORMANS IN THE SOUTH

Mediterranean Meetings in the Central Middle Ages

ALL DAY | OXFORD PHENOMENOLOGY NETWORK PANEL DISCUSSION

Interdisciplinary panel at the British Association for Modernist Studies (BAMS) International Conference, 2017

Saturday 1 July

ALL DAY | THE NORMANS IN THE SOUTH

Mediterranean Meetings in the Central Middle Ages

09:30 – 10:30 | CALLIGEOFIGURESQUES

Mark Davis 

10:30 – 11:30 | COLLECTING ISLAMIC ART: A DANGEROUS HISTORY

Speaker: Oliver Watson 

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The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities

Radcliffe Humanities, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Woodstock Road, Oxford, OX2 6GG

01865 280101

www.torch.ox.ac.uk

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