Keeping you up to date with all the goings-on at TORCH

TORCH Newsletter Hilary Term

Weeks 7 & 8 (25th February 2018 – 10th March 2018)

As we move swiftly through Hilary Term, TORCH would like to welcome a new network to its community. The Violence Studies Oxford Network hosts scholars of violence from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds within and beyond the humanities and social sciences to present the findings of their original research. They are particularly keen to hear from those who research violence in minute detail as a separate phenomenon to war so do get in touch if this is for you. 

We will be holding a training session with editors from The Conversation on 28 February. The session will give Oxford researchers the opportunity to learn more on how to train and pitch for them. See here for more details. 

The TORCH Women in Humanities programme is hosting a round-table discussion on 'One hundred years of women's suffrage: how far have we come?' on 8 March. See here for details. 

We would like to draw your attention to a a community event: The Foxes of Oxford comes out of the Turtle Opera drama and music project for 10 – 14 year olds with Autistic Spectrum Conditions. For more information on this performance, click here

Finally, there are a number of AHRC-doctoral funding opportunities for researchers in the humanities. Please see below for more information. 

Highlighted Event

Transnational Lives and Cosmopolitan Communities

Saturday, March 17, 2018 - 10:00am to 5:00pm
Leonard Wolfson Auditorium, Wolfson College, Linton Rd, Oxford OX2 6UD

This one-day conference will examine the relationship between life-writing, transnationalism and language-led research. Key questions to be explored include: the representation of cosmopolitan identities; the transnational circulation of fame; and the tangled relationship between creativity, migration, and exile. Convened by Philip Bullock and Sandra Mayer in collaboration with the "Writing 1900” research network.

Please register for this conference here. All welcome. 

This conference is organised by the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Please click here for more information

News, Blogs and Calls for Papers

Video: Ethnicised Religion and Sacralised Ethnicity in the Past & the Present

The commonly invoked phrase ‘Islam is not a race’ forms a ubiquitous racist trope that represents Islamophobia as a legitimate political critique of religious ideology, rather than a form of ethnic and religious prejudice. Yet in spite of such rhetorical acrobatics, it is clear that we are observing an ‘ethnicisation’ of Islam in ‘the West’ – the hegemonic transformation of hugely diverse ‘Muslim’ populations into an allegedly singular community, defined in essentialising racist terms. Hidden behind the language of a binary between ‘Muslim’ and ‘British’/‘European’/’Western’ ‘culture’ and ‘values’ – viewing these as fixed communal essences, rather than endlessly variable phenomena reproduced in the material practices of everyday life – this ethnoreligious essentialism-come-racism has gained ever-increasing acceptance in mainstream political discourse. Islam forms a particularly salient example today, but the ethnicisation of religious identifications is a phenomenon with a much broader transtemporal and global history. 

This round-table discussed this phenomenon, focusing especially on the nexus of religious, ethnic and national identifications in colonial, anticolonial and postcolonial settings from Ireland to South Asia.

An expert panel came together to discuss: 

Elisabeth Bolorinos Allard, (Magdalen College, University of Oxford)

Faisal Devji, (Reader in Modern South Asian History, University of Oxford)

Peter Leary, (Institute of Advanced Studies, UCL)

This event was chaired by Ilya Afanasyev (BRIHC Research Fellow, University of Birmingham).

Part of the Humanities & Identities series.

Monumental Panel Workshop 1: Museums and National Identity

This term’s first panel workshop in the Monumental strand was led by Dr Jane Potter and explored the theme of ‘Museums and National Identity’. The five panellists, whose diverse backgrounds ranged from heritage conservation to archaeology, explored an array of vital questions such as: What materials should monuments be made from? Who holds the right to build them? Do they have a time-stamp?

Mark Johnston, Director of the Australian National Veterans Arts Museum, opened the panel with a speech about the importance of reconciliation. He explored how and with whom commemoration can be undertaken in an inclusive way, advising that all stories must be involved – from fallen soldiers to former enemies to survivors – in order to commemorate all lives lost. He also emphasised the importance of looking ahead to the future, at the soldiers fighting now and how to cater for their families, in order to honour and learn from the past.

Read this Post-War: Commemoration, Reconstruction, Reconciliation blog in full here

After Clarice: Lispector’s Legacy

The conference “After Clarice: Lispector’s Legacy” not only commemorated 40 years since the death of the celebrated Brazilian writer Clarice Lispector, but also aimed to analyse her legacy and influence as it has developed in the decades since. 

Lispector is one of the most widely translated and re-translated Portuguese-language writers of the twentieth century. Internationally acclaimed writers, from Hélène Cixous to Ali Smith and Colm Tóibín, have acknowledged the transformative influence of her writing on their own work. A recent issue of the U.S. journal The Scofield was dedicated entirely to translations and rewritings of Lispector, not to mention art and photography inspired by her oeuvre. “After Clarice” addressed the place and status of Lispector in twentieth/twenty-first century configurations of world literature by bringing together a variety of “readers” of her work: twenty-two academics, five translators (Katrina Dodson and Magdalena Edwards [U.S. English], Xuefei Min [Mandarin], Yael Segalovitz [Hebrew] and Paloma Vidal [Latin American Spanish]), two novelists (Hélia Correia [Portugal] and Martin MacInnes [UK]) and a performance artist (Magdalena Edwards). The delegates ranged from established scholars to postgraduates who travelled from across the globe to participate in the conference.

Read this Humanities & Identities conference blog in full here

Jin Xing: Paradoxes of Queerness in Global China Today

When you type ‘Jin Xing’ into Google Search, numerous articles written in English appear— articles which introduce this major Chinese TV personality to the Western audience as ‘China’s transgender TV star,’ ‘The Oprah of China, Who Happens to Be Transgender,’ ‘The Badass Transgender Talk Show Host in China’…etc. It seems that the name is almost always attached to the labels ‘transgender’ and ‘China/Chinese.’ However, if you type in her name in Chinese 金星 into the search bar of China’s most popular search engine Baidu, news articles simply address her as ‘Dancer Jin Xing’ and ‘Talk Show Host Jin Xing.’ This is Paradox One of the Jin Xing phenomenon in global China today: many in the West find it surprising that an ‘authoritarian’ country like the People’s Republic of China would be so accommodating of this transgender star. However, the constant highlighting of her transgender and national identity in the reports of Western media outlets appears to upset the conventional binary of ‘progressive West’ vs. ‘repressive China’.

Read this Queer Studies Network blog in full here

New Opportunities

AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Award: Country House Politics after 1950

Applications are invited for an AHRC-funded DPhil offered jointly by the Faculty of History, at the University of Oxford and Historic Houses.

This DPhil project is concerned with the role of the independently owned country house in political and cultural discourse from the 1950s to the present day. It builds on earlier work by Peter Mandler (1997), John Cornforth (1999), Patrick Wright (2009) and Ruth Adams (2013) and aims to extend this field through interrogation of different public policy approaches to the fate of country house heritage in diverse political contexts. The study will go to the heart of current policy debates about the nature and meaning of historic house heritage, its significance and public value, and the future of the ‘public private partnership’ between owners and the state in its long-term care.

For more information, click here

Deadline Friday 9 March 2018.

Oxfordshire Science and Ideas Festival 

The call to participate in this years’ Science and Ideas Festival is now open, and will close on Monday 30 April. The expression of interest form can be found here: https://if-oxford.com/.

IF Oxford Science are keen to work with academics, researchers, businesses, charities and community groups to build an exciting, innovative, high quality programme of events based around science and technology, social science, arts and humanities and are particularly interested in events that will combine and cut across these disciplines.

There are three opportunities in March for you to meet the Festival team informally and discuss how you might choose to be involved. 

For more information click here

OxTalent

Have you been impressed by a member of staff or a student who has used technology in an exciting way? Have you created a great app, or designed an eye-catching conference poster or data visualisation?

The University’s annual OxTALENT competition has launched to celebrate and reward the innovative use of digital technologies to enhance teaching, learning, research, and outreach. The awards will be presented at a red carpet evening attended by Professor Martin Williams, Pro-VC (Education). The competition is open to all students and staff, and awards can be given either to individuals or to groups. You can submit an entry yourself or nominate a colleague who has impressed you with their use of technology. 

Click here for more information. 

Deadline Friday 27 April 2018. 

TORCH-Mellon Humanities & Identities Conference and Workshop Funding 

We welcome proposals from Oxford researchers in the humanities or in collaboration with humanities scholars for workshops/conferences relating to the headline theme ‘Humanities & Identities’, funded by the VC Diversity Fund and the Andrew W Mellon Foundation.

There are £500-£1000 sums available. 

The series will focus on multiple research areas relating to diversity including race, gender, sexuality, disability, poverty, class, religion and inequality.

For full details click here

Deadline 1 June 2018. 

TORCH-Mellon Visiting 'Global South' Professorships and Mellon 'Global South' Fellowships

We are looking for applications from Oxford Humanities academics to host a visiting ‘Global South’ Professorship or Fellowship between 2017-2019.

These visiting professorships and fellowships cover bursary, travel, accommodation and hosting while the visiting speakers carry out a series of public events, seminars and drop-in discussions, also including, filming and live web-streaming.

The Mellon ‘Global South’ Visiting Professorships and Fellowships will run January-March, May-June, or October-November, that is to say, in term. We will welcome participation from Visitors in our TORCH networks and programmes, including ‘Women in the Humanities’, ‘Medical Humanities’, and ‘Race and Resistance’. We will seek applications specifically from institutions in the Global South, including from India, Pakistan, Malaysia, Philippines, Mauritius, Nigeria, Ghana, Kenya, Tanzania, and across Southern Africa and the Caribbean.

For more information click here

Deadline 1 June 2018.

TORCH New Network Scheme

The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities (TORCH) seeks to stimulate and support research activity that transcends disciplinary and institutional boundaries. To this end, the Centre invites applications from colleagues seeking to establish, or consolidate, multi- or interdisciplinary research networks to be based at the Radcliffe Humanities Building.

TORCH encourages imaginative cross-disciplinary applications, and will not sponsor research groups whose activities could be supported by a single college or faculty. Applications from cross-divisional research groups and from groups engaged with non-academic partners are also welcomed. Lead applicants must include postgraduates and postholders or early-career scholars from at least two faculties and colleges.

For more information please click here

The next deadline is midday Friday 1 June 2018.

For a full list of current opportunities, please visit the website

Upcoming Events

Multilayered Networks, Information Gathering and Letter-Writing: For a 'New Diplomatic History' of Early Renaissance Italy (1350 - 1520 ca.)

Tuesday, February 27, 2018 - 5:30pm
Seminar Room, Radcliffe Humanities, Woodstock Road, Oxford, OX2 6GG

The TORCH network on Diplomacy in the Early Modern Period (1400 - 1800) are hosting a talk on 'Multilayered Networks, Information Gathering and Letter-Writing: For a 'New Diplomatic History' of Early Renaissance Italy (1350 - 1520 ca.) with Professor Isabella Lazzarini (Università degli Studi del Molise).

Please click here for more information

Oxford University Innovation Friday Drop-In Session

Friday, March 9, 2018 - 10:30am to 12:30pm
TORCH reception

Have you got an idea that you think people will be interested in? You know that it solves a problem but would like some advice on how to take it forward.

Oxford University Innovation is one of the many organisations around Oxford that can help. The idea could have come as a result of your research or it could be in a completely different field. Either way, we’re here to offer advice and support and to help you take it forward.

It could be an idea for a business, a social enterprise, an app, a new methodology, a more efficient way of doing things. Whatever it is (and at whatever stage your idea is at) pop along to see them for an informal chat.

Please click here for more information

Mind-Boggling Medical History: Launch

Wednesday, February 28, 2018 - 5:00pm to 7:30pm
Royal College of Nursing, London, W1G 0RN

Join the Royal College of Nursing Library & Archives for the launch of "Mind-Boggling Medical History" and explore the unexpected in medical and healthcare practice and history.

Mind-Boggling Medical History is a card game and educational resource led by the Constructing Scientific Communities project at the University of Oxford, in partnership with RCN Library and Archives. It is funded by the Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC). The educational game is designed to challenge preconceptions and show how ideas in medicine change for a variety of reasons.

The online game is accompanied by teaching resources to enable it to be used in schools for history or health education lessons, and for nursing and medical students at university.

Attendees at the launch will all receive a limited edition printed pack of the 50 card game and answer booklet.

Please click here for more information

#ENDING THE SILENCE

Saturday, February 24, 2018 - 7:30pm
Old Fire Station, Oxford, OX1 2AQ

Where are our heroes, history makers and change-makers? Why are so many not recognised in our history books or halls of fame? Ending the Silence is a protest-for-change style of theatre exploring the black diaspora experience and the struggles for justice, equality and human rights. It fuses theatre, dance, song and performance poetry to create a strong visual and emotional performance.

The evening starts at 7pm with drumming in the bar. The show begins at 7.30pm, and is in three sections.  At 9pm there will be an after-show DJ set in the bar.

Ending the Silence will kick-start a year of remembrance and celebration around the 70th anniversary of the arrival of the Empire Windrush from the West Indies at Tilbury docks in 1948, and with it the first large group of post-war immigration into Britain.

Unlock the Chains Collective produces work that gives opportunities to Black Artists to create work that explore their experience, culture and identity and this production also contributes to the #BlackLivesMatter movement.

Please click here for more information

Looking back

As we move swiftly through the academic year, we look back at some of our past highlights. 

On Violence, Gender, and Sacrifice: Old Stories and New Reflections

TORCH's Crisis, Extremes, and Apocalypse network hosted a seminar on the topic of sacrifice by revisiting the concept of Sacrifice in late modernity in its various configurations, philosophical and ideological. This talk 'On Violence, Gender, and Sacrifice: Old Stories and New Reflections' was given by Kimberley Hutchings (Queen Mary University London).

Listen here

Britain's History and Memory of Transatlantic Slavery

Transatlantic slavery, just like the abolition movements, affected every space and community in Britain, from Cornwall to the Clyde, from dockyard alehouses to country estates. Today, its financial, architectural and societal legacies remain, scattered across the country in museums and memorials, philanthropic institutions and civic buildings, empty spaces and unmarked graves. Just as they did in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, British people continue to make sense of this ‘national sin’ by looking close to home, drawing on local histories and myths to negotiate their relationship to the distant horrors of the ‘Middle Passage’, and the Caribbean plantation. This collection brings together localised case studies of Britain’s history and memory of its involvement in the transatlantic slave trade, and slavery. Co-editor Ryan Hanley (History, University of Oxford) joined an expert panel to discuss these essays, ranging in focus from eighteenth-century Liverpool to twenty-first-century rural Cambridgeshire, from racist ideologues to Methodist preachers, examining how transatlantic slavery impacted on, and continues to impact, people and places across Britain.

Ryan was joined by:

Bob Harris (Professor of British History, University of Oxford)

Padraic Scanlan (Associate Professor in International History, LSE)

This event was chaired by Sebabatso Manoeli (Lecturer in African History, University of Oxford). 

Part of Book at Lunchtime, a fortnightly series of bite size book discussions, with commentators from a range of disciplines. 

Watch here

Events Calendar, Weeks 7-8

Monday 26 February

10:00am to 1:00pm | WHAT I WISH SOMEONE HAD TOLD ME WHEN I STARTED: READING FOR A DPHIL IN THE HUMANITIES

Humanities Training

11:00am to 12:30pm | PATRIARCHY?

Pastoralism and Patriarchy: The Political Economy of the Gerontocratic Ideal in Turkana, Kenya

12:00pm to 3:30pm | TEACHING MEDIEVAL DIVERSITY

Workshop

12:45pm to 2:00pm | THE LENS OF GENDER: RESEARCH-LED TEACHING

The first in a series of workshops

5:00pm | MARIA THERESA AND THE CATHOLIC ENLIGHTENMENT

Part of the Maria Thersea workshop

5:00pm | MARIA THERESA (1717-1780): TERCENTENARY WORKSHOP ON THE HABSBURG EMPRESS AND HER TIME

A half day workshop

Tuesday 27 February

10:00am | ELOQUENT THINGS: TEACHING USING REAL OBJECTS

Humanities Training

10:00am to 12:00pm | WRITING HISTORICAL BIOGRAPHY: PROBLEMS AND CHALLENGES

Barbara Stollberg-Rilinger and Lyndal Roper 

12:30pm to 2:00pm | GEOMETRY OF NARRATIVE SPACES : BUILT ENVIRONMENT AND MODERN PROSE

This event has been cancelled

2:00pm to 4:00pm | VOICE CULTURE WITH SHRUTI JAUHARI

Part of the 'Sounds of South Asia' Series

2:00pm to 3:00pm | PALGRAVE PRESENTATION AND 1:1 CONSULTATIONS WITH COMMISSIONING EDITORS

Humanities Training

3:30pm to 4:30pm | IL MILIONE & TRAVELS

The Medieval Book Club

4:00pm | CURRENT TRENDS IN THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF BUREAUCRACY

Paper, Rules, Status: Migrants and Precarious Bureaucracy in Contemporary Italy

5:15pm to 6:45pm | THE UNIQUE FEATURES OF HINDUSTANI MUSIC

Part of the 'Sounds of South Asia' Series

5:30pm to 7:00pm | SEXO-AESTHETIC INVERSION

Transgender Subjectivities in Late Nineteenth- and Early Twentieth-Century Literature and Science

5:30pm to 7:00pm | MULTILAYERED NETWORKS, INFORMATION GATHERING AND LETTER-WRITING

For a “new diplomatic history” of early Renaissance Italy (1350-1520 ca.)

5:30pm to 7:00pm | WHAT COUNTS AS EVIDENCE?

Objects and their Stories

5:30pm | MULTILAYERED NETWORKS, INFORMATION GATHERING AND LETTER-WRITING

For a 'New Diplomatic History' or Early Renaissance Italy (1350 - 1520 ca.)

7:30pm | ISHTAR

Oxford Playhouse play

Wednesday 28 February

All day | CONTEMPORARY INTERPRETATIONS, FUTURE DIRECTIONS

Diaconia workshop

11:30am to 2:30pm | THE CONVERSATION – WRITING & PITCHING – EDITORS IN RESIDENCE DAY HT 2018

Open to Oxford researchers

1:00pm to 3:00pm | ARTICLE 32 VCLT AND SOME PROBLEMS OF TREATY INTERPRETATION

Negotiated Texts Seminar

5:00pm to 7:30pm | MIND-BOGGLING MEDICAL HISTORY: LAUNCH

Launch event in London

5:15pm to 7:00pm | POSTPONED: QUEERYING SPACES: TRANSNATIONAL PERSPECTIVES

Queer Studies Research Network

8:15pm to 9:30pm | APPROPRIATION, CROSS-POLLINATION, CULTURAL TRANSMISSION

Part of the 'Sounds of South Asia' Series

Thursday 1 March

10:00am to 12:00pm | INTRODUCTION TO CROWDSOURCING

Humanities Training

1:00pm | WOMEN IN ACADEMIA

Oxford Women in Politics (OxWiP) event 

1:00pm to 2:00pm | PHOTOGRAPHY AND TIBET

Book at Lunchtime with Clare Harris

2:00pm to 5:00pm | CONSTRUCTING MESSAGES OF WAR

A Symposium

2:00pm to 5:00pm | SHUT UP AND WRITE

Humanities Division

5:30pm | DANSOX PRESENTS ALASTAIR MACAULAY ON FRED ASTAIRE

7:00pm | 1001 STORIES: TELLING LINES NARRATIVE ART

Professor Alexander Sturgis and Curator Paul Hobson in conversation

Friday 2 March

9:30am to 5:30pm | STUDY DAY ON ACOUSTIC CITIES

Urban Rhythms Network

10:00am to 5:00pm | GLOBAL & IMPERIAL HISTORY GRADUATE STUDENT RESEARCH PRESENTATIONS (D.PHIL.)

Global & Imperial History Research Seminar

10:30am to 12:30pm | OXFORD UNIVERSITY INNOVATION FRIDAY DROP-IN SESSION

Have you got an idea that you think people will be interested in?

12:30pm to 1:45pm | READING GROUP WITH THE CENTRE FOR GENDER IDENTITY AND SUBJECTIVITY

5:00pm | SCIENCE AS REVOLUTION

Professor Sir Paul Nurse 

5:15pm to 6:45pm | "GRANDVILLE AND THE ANTHROPOMORPHIC TRADITION" & "THE RED VIRGIN AND THE VISION OF UTOPIA"

Speakers: Bryan and Mary Talbot

5:15pm to 7:15pm | CLOSE-READING A GLOBAL NOVEL ACROSS LANGUAGES

Prismatic Jane Eyre

6:00pm to 8:30pm | MEET BEAU DICK: MAKER OF MONSTERS

The UK Premiere

Saturday 3 March

9:30am to 2:00pm | GRAVE STONES: PANEL-LED WORKSHOP 2

Monumental Commemoration: Mellon-Sawyer Seminar Series

11:00am to 5:00pm | TEXTUAL STRATEGIES FOR ELUCIDATING THE UNIVERSE

Early Text Cultures at Oxford presents

Monday 5 March

All day | THE JEWISH COUNTRY HOUSE

Workshop looking at the Jewish country house as a focus for scholarly research and as a site of European memory

11:00am to 12:30pm | PATRIARCHY?

Reproduction, Relations and Paternalism during Fertility Decline

12:30pm to 1:30pm | TRANS AESTHETIC ACTIVISM, DRAG LIP-SYNC PERFORMANCE AND ‘BUMPING’ IN GAY LIFE

Queer Theory Research Lunch

12:45pm to 2:00pm | DISCUSSION GROUP

Hosted by the Oxford Comparative Criticism and Translation programme

5:00pm | DO WE NEED THE CONCEPT OF ENLIGHTENMENT? A SURVEY OF OLDER AND MORE RECENT DEBATES

Part of the Besterman Enlightenment workshop series

5:15pm to 6:45pm | DELUSION AND SPIRITUAL EXPERIENCE: A ROLE FOR CULTURAL VALUES IN MENTAL HEALTH?

7:15pm | THEATRE AND PERFORMANCE STUDIES READING GROUP

Postcolonial Drama led by Dr Vanessa Lee

Tuesday 6 March

11:30am | MOBILITY, MIGRATION AND PLACE: LOCATING FEMALE SERVANTS IN THE ENGLISH COMMUNITY, 1550-1650

Gender, Women and Culture Seminar

12:30pm to 2:00pm | I HATE THE LAKE DISTRICT

This event has been cancelled

1:00pm to 2:00pm | FRANK RAMSEY: A SHEER EXCESS OF POWERS

Life Writing Lunch

1:00pm to 2:00pm | EARLY CAREER LUNCH (2)

Humanities Training

3:30pm to 4:30pm | MEDIEVAL MANUSCRIPT VISIT TO MERTON LIBRARY

The Medieval Book Club

4:00pm | CURRENT TRENDS IN THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF BUREAUCRACY

"The Indian state is nothing but a paper tiger": For an anthropology of the bureaucratic state

5:00pm | ANNUAL MEDIEVAL STUDIES LECTURE

Medieval Roadshow

5:00pm | CHANNELS OF COMMUNICATION: RETHINKING CONNECTIONS AND THEIR LIMITS IN THE SUEZ CANAL REGION C. 1900

Maritime Approaches to Global History Series

5:15pm | BEYOND THE HEADLINES: MUSLIM WOMEN ON IDENTITIES, OPPORTUNITIES, AND STRUCTURAL CHALLENGES IN BRITAIN TODAY

Merton Equality Conversation 2018

5:30pm to 7:00pm | EUROPE'S DIPLOMATIC CULTURE, C.1700-1900: CONTINUITY AND CHANGE

Speaker: Professor Hamish Scott

Wednesday 7 March

12:00pm to 5:00pm | THREE MINUTE THESIS COMPETITION

Humanities Training

2:00pm to 6:45pm | WORLD LITERATURE: FOR AND AGAINST (PART 2)

Mellon Global South Visiting Professorship

2:00pm to 3:30pm | THE RELATION OF LITERATURE AND LEARNING TO SOCIAL HIERARCHY IN EARLY MODERN EUROPE

5:15pm | PORTRAITS AND LITERATURE

Part of the 'Towards a Social History of Photoliterature and the Photobook' series

Thursday 8 March

3:00pm to 5:00pm | HERITAGE PATHWAY: PROJECT DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOP

Humanities Training

4:00pm | PATRIOTISM AND SOCIAL ORDER: ARMED ASSOCIATIONS IN HABSBURG AUSTRIA, 1900-1918

Speaker: Dr. Claire Morelon (University of Padova)

6:30pm | ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF WOMEN'S SUFFRAGE: HOW FAR HAVE WE COME?

Oxford International Women's Day 2018

Friday 9 March

10:00am to 5:00pm | GLOBAL & IMPERIAL HISTORY GRADUATE STUDENT RESEARCH PRESENTATIONS (M.ST.)

Global & Imperial History Research Seminar

10:30am to 12:30pm | OXFORD UNIVERSITY INNOVATION FRIDAY DROP-IN SESSION

Have you got an idea that you think people will be interested in?

2:00pm to 5:30pm | BRAHMS AND BEYOND

The Oxford Song Network

2:00pm to 4:00pm | FEMINIST AMBIVALENCE: POWER, GENDER AND COLLUSION

Oxford Feminist Thinking Seminar Series

Saturday 10 March

9:00am to 5:00pm | POSTGRADUATE FORUM

Monumental Commemoration: Mellon-Sawyer Seminar Series

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The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities

Radcliffe Humanities, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Woodstock Road, Oxford, OX2 6GG

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