Keeping you up to date with all the goings-on at TORCH

TORCH Newsletter Michaelmas Term

Weeks 5 & 6 (5 – 19 November 2017)

With the changing of the clocks, the middle of term brings together a diverse and exciting schedule of network research events and opportunities. As always, all welcome!

Our first Global South Visiting Professor, Prof Rosinka Chaudhuri, has joined us and is hosted by the English Faculty and St Hugh's College, in addition to TORCH. This scheme will include ten Visiting Professors and Fellows over the next two years and bring leading scholars from around the world to Oxford. 

We welcome the recently launched networks in Queer Studies,  Migration and Mobility, and Diplomacy in Early Modern Period 1400-1800. New members are always welcome - if you are a researcher working in relevant areas, please feel free to contact the network leads and ask to be added to their mailing lists.  

As part of our lunchtime series, we are marking UK Disability History Month with the event 'Stress, Strain, and Overwork in Historical Perspective' and as part of our ongoing Humanities & Identities series includes 'Me and My Beliefs: Challenges of Identity and Society', and 'LGBT Lives: Narratives and Representation'.  

We are thrilled to be part of the national Being Human Festival again this year with 'Lost Late: Night at the Museums', in collaboration with the Pitt Rivers and Oxford University Museum of Natural History 7-10pm on Friday 17th November. Join researchers in the museums as they share their work through performance, object handling, and even humanities games in the Game Cafe! The Young Women's Music Project will be DJing in the Pitt Rivers, and there will be projections on the front of the museum building - FREE but booking essential.  

Highlighted Event

Me and My Beliefs: Challenges of Identity and Society

Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 5:30pm to 7:00pm
L1, Mathematical Institute, Andrew Wiles Building, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, OX2 6GG

Bishop Libby Lane is Britain’s first woman bishop in the Church of England. In this talk Bishop Libby explores the pathway that brought her to this position and addresses an area of identity not always covered in diversity debates. A panel of prominent speakers joins her in discussing what it means to be a person of faith in Britain today and impacts on diversity.

On the panel:

Jas' Elsner (Professor of Late Antique Art, Faculty of Classics, University of Oxford and project lead on Empires of Faith)

Shaista Aziz (freelance journalist and writer specialising on identity, race, gender and Muslim women. Founder of The Everyday Bigotry Project)

This event will be chaired by Elleke Boehmer (Professor in World Literatures in English, University of Oxford)

Booking is essential. Please register here for your seat. 

There will be a drinks reception following the discussion.

This series is part of the Humanities & Identities Series.  

Please click here for more information

News and Blogs

First Ever Global South Professor Announced

Professor Chaudhuri is currently Director and Professor of Cultural Studies at the Centre for Studies in Social Sciences, Calcutta (CSSSC) and has been announced at the first ever Global South Professor. 

The new visiting professorship, which sits in The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities, is part of a wider aim to diversify the curriculum in Oxford’s humanities departments.

“The Global South Fellowships have been set up at TORCH in collaboration with host departments and colleges to deepen and widen our understanding of the world beyond what used to be called the west or the Anglo-American world,” says Professor Elleke Boehmer (Director of TORCH 2015-17).

Click here to read the full news item.

Books and the Postcolonial World

Dr Erica Lombard has written a blog on Fighting Words: Fifteen Books that Shaped the Postcolonial World.

The publication consider how books – as both carriers of ideas and ideologies and portable physical objects – have moved through and shaped aspects of the postcolonial world in the long twentieth century. 

Click here to read more.

Post-War: Commemoration, Reconstruction, and Reconciliation

The Mellon-Sawyer seminar series Post-War: Commemoration, Reconstruction, and Reconciliation have featured a number of blog posts written by Jeremy Treglown, Philippe Sands, and Dunya Mikhail. The series will be running from 2017-18.

Click here to read the blog posts.

Part-time Humanities & Identities Project Officer

Part-time Humanities & Identities Project Officer
TORCH, Humanities Divisional Office, Radcliffe Humanities, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Oxford

Grade 5: £24,983 - £29,799 p.a. (pro rata)
This post, based at The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities (TORCH), will play a key role in the administration and organisation of activity related to the project ‘Humanities and Identities’, and in particular to the successful delivery of the Andrew W Mellon funded strands of the series. The post is part-time at 0.6 FTE and fixed-term for 1 year.

The post has particular responsibility for the ‘Global South’ visiting professorships and fellowships initiative; the two Knowledge Exchange fellowships; and the planned state-of-the-art discussions and colloquia sessions focussing on curriculum review. The role will enable and sustain the important collaboration with Mellon, as well as with Humanities scholars at institutions in the Global South, and will consolidate the exciting opportunities for international and interdisciplinary exchange that these links make possible. The position will involve extensive planning, organisation, facilitation and outreach, including media and publicity work, as well as college and faculty liaison.

You will need good people skills at all levels, including donors, senior academic leaders and administrative staff, along with the ability to work under pressure, and to juggle competing deadlines. Accuracy, attention to detail and a readiness to contribute to the overall success of TORCH is essential.

For an informal discussion about the post, please contact Victoria McGuinness, TORCH Business Manager (victoria.mcguinness@humanities.ox.ac.uk).

Applications must be made online.

The deadline for applications is 12.00 noon on Wednesday 15 November 2017. You will be required to upload a supporting statement as part of your application.

For more information and to apply please click here.

New Opportunities

AHRC-TORCH Graduate Fund

The AHRC-TORCH Graduate Fund scheme runs every year during Michaelmas Term. Proposals will be assessed by the Student Peer Review College and by the Humanities Graduate Studies Committee. The deadline to submit applications this term is 13 November 2017 at 12pm and applicants will be notified of the outcome via email by the end of week 10.

Each project requires at least two lead applicants from different faculties within the Humanities Division. Applications are open to current doctoral students. Additional contributors from varying career stages and other Divisions are most welcome. The support of each lead applicant's supervisor, confirming that the project will not interfere with the applicant’s academic commitments, is required.

Applications should be made by completing the application form, and returning it to gradprojects@humanities.ox.ac.uk by the deadline.

For more information, please click here.

Africa- Oxford (AfOx) Travel Grants

Africa - Oxford (AfOx) travel grants support the establishment of new collaborations between Africa and Oxford for research or teaching. 

AfOx travel grants supports visits between potential collaborators in African institutions and their colleagues in Oxford, with a view to developing new collaborations around research or teaching. Applications are open to any discipline within the University.

The grant can be used to cover costs of travel (in either direction i.e. Oxford staff to an African institution or vice versa), accommodation and incidental expenses to a maximum of £5000 (it is anticipated that visits in general will be for periods between 1-8 weeks). Applications are made jointly between a member of staff at Oxford and a potential collaborator in an African institution (the travel award may cover more than two people and additional individuals should be named under purpose of the grant). The overarching aim of the scheme is to foster the development of new collaborations and the scheme is not intended to be used as alternative support for already established collaborations. The application will be reviewed and receive feedback within 7 days. 

For more information, please click here

Global Challenges Research Fund

The Global Challenges Research Fund supports interdisciplinary research excellence with impact in developing countries. Oxford has decades of experience and expertise conducting research in lower- and middle-income countries across all our divisions. Their case studies demonstrate the breadth of research and impact across the world, whilst their interactive map demonstrates the scale of research conducted by Oxford.

GCRF also provide a range of practical resources for researchers conducting or beginning to conduct research in developing countries. Please see the GCRF funding pages for calls and opportunities to support global challenges research – both GCRF and beyond.

For more information, please see the website.

Mellon Humanities & Identities Conference and Workshop Funding 

£500-£1000 sums available for conferences and workshops.

We welcome proposals from Oxford researchers in the humanities or in collaboration with humanities scholars for workshops/conferences relating to the headline theme ‘Humanities & Identities’, funded by the VC Diversity Fund and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Applications should be no longer than 2 pages long and outline the research questions and areas covered by the workshop/conference, timeframe, indicative budget and academic leads, which should also include early career researchers.

For more information, please click here

The next deadline is midday Friday 10 November 2017.

New Network Scheme

The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities (TORCH) seeks to stimulate and support research activity that transcends disciplinary and institutional boundaries. To this end, the Centre invites applications from colleagues seeking to establish, or consolidate, multi- or interdisciplinary research networks to be based at the Radcliffe Humanities Building.

Each academic term The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities will sponsor the creation and/or development of up to three multi- or interdisciplinary research networks by providing a venue, funding, a web presence and publicity. Funding will ordinarily be up to £2,500. Funding is for one year (renewable for a further year on application after first year). 

TORCH encourages imaginative cross-disciplinary applications, and will not sponsor research groups whose activities could be supported by a single college or faculty. Applications from cross-divisional research groups and from groups engaged with non-academic partners are also welcomed. Lead applicants must include postgraduates and postholders or early-career scholars from at least two faculties and colleges.

For more information please click here

The next deadline is midday Friday 10 November 2017.

Oxford Playhouse Spotlight Discussions

An opportunity for an Oxford humanities researcher to lead a Spotlight discussion event this autumn.  

Spotlight is for anyone aged 50 or over with an interest in theatre. Each session is a friendly and relaxed lunchtime meet-up to socialise and talk all things theatre.

Spotlight is led by a member of OP staff, joined by a researcher to talk more about their role in the current show, or themes and issues explored in this season’s productions.

Researchers will be asked to give a short introduction of 10-15 minutes exploring themes in the play, the writer, significant historical productions, adaptations etc.

Event dates and details are as follows:

• Thursday 2nd November: Driving Miss Daisy

• Thursday 16th November: As You Like It

All sessions run from 12:30pm - 14:00pm.

For more information please click here.

Win an Oxford Sparks Animation

Oxford Sparks are offering one research group the chance to make an animation with them for free. Just fill out this simple form by 5pm Friday 17 November 2017.

What's included?

You'll get the full Oxford Sparks treatment, which includes: a two minute animation produced on your research in the Oxford Sparks style, a teaching resources pack designed for secondary science teachers related to the animation, and promotion of the animation via our social media channels (which could also include doing a Facebook live interview/event).

For more information, please click here.

Upcoming Events

Lost Late: Night at the Museums

Friday, November 17, 2017 - 7:00pm - 10.00pm
Pitt Rivers Museum and Oxford University Museum of Natural History, Oxford

TORCH is thrilled to be taking part in this year's Being Human Festival 2017.

Themed around 'Lost Late: Night at the Museums', the evening will see humanities researchers, academics and community groups from across Oxford come together for a night of dance, theatre, and music performances, games, interactive talks, music & film installations, bite-size talks, projections and art.

Taking place at the Pitt Rivers Museum and Oxford University Museum of Natural History, the museums will come alive with researchers for a whole evening with the themes of Lost and Found, surrounded by the fantastic museums’ collections.

The Being Human Festival is led by the School of Advanced Study, University of London in partnership with the Arts & Humanities Research Council and the British Academy. This year’s festival is taking place nationally 17 – 25 November 2017. 

Tickets are free but registration is required. Please register here.

Please click here for more information

Stress, Strain, and Overwork in Historical Perspective

Thursday, November 23, 2017 -1:00pm to 2:00pm
Seminar Room, Radcliffe Humanities, Woodstock Road, Oxford, OX2 6GG 

In this talk on Stress, Strain, and Overwork in Historical Perspective Professor Sally Shuttleworth (Faculty of English Language and Literature) will look at discussions of stress and overwork in both education and professional life in the Victorian era.  Although we are clearly living in a radically altered world, there are nonetheless startling similarities in the ways the problems of overwork have been framed and debated, then and now.   

Registration is free. Booking essential.

Click here to register for your free ticket.

Lunch from 12.30pm. Talk from 1pm.

Please click here for more information

A Night of Local Tudor Accidents

Friday, November 10, 2017 - 7:00pm
The Old Museum, Museum of Oxford, St Aldate's, Oxford OX1 1BX

Join Professor Steven Gunn (History, Oxford University) as he takes us on a fascinating journey through some of the Hidden Histories of Oxford and Oxfordshire with local Tudor Accidents! Heard about the bear attack in north Oxford? The building supplies delivery accident at Christ Church? Or the bowls on ice incident on the Cherwell? What about the throwing the sledgehammer competition that went wrong in Ardington, or the Marsh Baldon maypole mishap?

Interesting and comical, the evening will also involve object handling, the historical 'What happened next?' game and barge bar (cash only).

Booking for this event is through Eventbrite, please follow this link.

Please click here for more information

Oxford University and the National Trust: Collaborating for Change

Thursday, November 16, 2017 - 10:30am
Auditorium, Magdalen College, Longwall Street, Oxford, OX1 4AU

Alice Purkiss (Trusted Source) will be giving a talk on 'Oxford University and the National Trust: Collaborating for Change'. The event is hosted by Oxford Centre of the National Trust.

Refreshments served from 10.30, with the talk starting at 11. A charge of £5 is made to members (£6 for non-members of the Oxford Centre).

More info at http://www.oxfordcnt.co.uk/talks.html

Please click here for more information

Looking back

As we move swiftly through the new academic year, we look back at some of our past highlights. 

The Rise of Endless War

The TORCH Crisis, Extremes, and Apocalypse network hosted a talk on 'The Rise of Endless War' with Professor Samuel Moyn (Harvard University). In this talk Samuel Moyn will discuss some alternatives within the reform of warfare and the path we have taken in the past few decades – suggesting that it may have been a mistake to opt to humanize war, rather than pacify the world.

Professor Moyn also discusses ideas for future work.

Listen here

Crime-Stopping Medicine: Swapping the Death Penalty for Drugs

What if, instead of killing criminals, we could simply make them better people – just by popping a pill? TORCH expert Dr David Birks talks to Oxplore, a University outreach project aimed at 11 to 18 year olds about the future of punishment and the possibility of a crime-stopping drug.

For more on this and other questions visit Oxplore.

Watch here

Events Calendar, Weeks 5-6

Monday 6 November

4:30pm to 6:30pm | EFFECTIVE ALTRUISM, PLURALISM, AND SINGER’S POND EXAMPLE

The first in a series of three lectures by Professor Larry S. Temkin

 

7:00pm to 9:00pm | OXFORD QUEER STUDIES NETWORK LAUNCH

Queer Studies Launch

 

Tuesday 7 November

5:00pm | DANTE TODAY: READERS AND AUDIENCES

Oxford Dante Society Roundtable

 

5.30pm to 7.00pm | THE GOOD PLACES OF SLEEP

Speaker: Professor Martin Willis (Cardiff University)

  

5:30pm to 7:00pm | GHOSTWRITING AND BIOGRAPHY

Part of the Fame and Shame OCLW seminar series

 

Wednesday 8 November

11:00amFORMS OF SERVICE IN THE LONG NINETEENTH CENTURY

Speakers: Fanny Louvier (Balliol College, University of Oxford) and Olivia Robinson (Kellogg College, University of Oxford)

 

1:00pm to 2:00pm | INSTRUMENTS OF EMANCIPATION: THE CHANGING USES AND ROLES OF KEYBOARDS IN THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY

Instruments of the Eighteenth Century Seminar Series

 

1:00pm to 2:00pm | IMAGINING THE DIVINE: ART AND THE RISE OF WORLD RELIGIONS

Book at Lunchtime discussion with Stefanie Lenk and Georgi Parpulov

 

5:00pm to 7:00pm | SINGER’S POND EXAMPLE VS SUPPORTING INTERNATIONAL AID ORGANIZATIONS

Lecture two in a three part series by Larry S. Temkin

  

5:15pm to 7:15pm | TRANSLATING GRAPHIC NOVELS: RED ROSA BY KATE EVANS

Speaker: Alejandra Crosta (University of Oxford)

 

7:00pm | WHERE DOES THE SELF RESIDE?

Part of the Islam and Biomedicine seminar series

 

7:30pm to 8:30pm | ART HISTORY: THE STONES OF ST MARY'S

 Series of talks looking at cultural, legal, intellectual works from 1517

  

7:30pm to 9:30pm | PANEL DISCUSSION: THE ABORTION ACT 50 YEARS ON: WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE?

Panel Discussion

  

Thursday 9 November

4:00pm | THE FIRST WORLD WAR AND THE AVENGERS OF 1870

Speaker: Dr Emma Login (Historic England)

 

5:00pm | WORLD LITERATURE: FOR AND AGAINST

Speakers: Professor Rosinka Chaudhuri, Elleke Boehmer, Peter McDonald, Pablo Mukherjee, and Stefan Helgesson

 

5:00pm | MEDIEVAL POLITICAL PROPHECY AND THE LIMITS OF NATIONAL IDENTITY

Speaker: Victoria Flood

 

5:00pm | THE DREAM COLONY: THE LIFE IN ART OF WALTER HOPPS

Deborah Treisman in conversation with Miguel de Baca

 

5:15pm | BECOMING/UNBECOMING

Speaker: Una (comics artist)

 

5:15pm to 6:45pm | SEMINAR ON JONATHAN LEAR 'INTERPRETING THE UNCONSCIOUS'

Part of the Making the Unconscious Conscious series

 

7:00pm to 9:00pm | ARGUMENTS ABOUT ABORTION

Kate Greasley in conversation with Richard Lyus

 

8:00pm to 9:30pm | AN INTRODUCTION TO ST. JEROME

Saints and Sinners: An Introduction to the Four Latin Fathers of the Church

 

Friday 10 November

12:30pm to 2:00pm | THE GLOBAL SIGNIFICANCE OF THE 2016 STUDENT PROTEST AND ARRESTS AT JAWAHARLAL NEHRU UNIVERSITY

Speaker: Professor Rosinka Chaudhuri

  

5:00pm to 7:00pm | SOME EMPIRICAL WORRIES AND UNCOMFORTABLE PHILOSOPHICAL POSSIBILITIES

The final lecture in the three part series by Larry S. Temkin

  

5:00pm to 6:30pm | ANGLO-NORMAN READING GROUP MT 2017

A forum in which to read, translate, and discuss a wide variety of Anglo-Norman texts

  

5:30pm to 6:00pm | A TWILIGHT TASTER OF LITERATURE, MUSIC & SCIENCE, FROM MEDIEVAL TIMES TO THE MODERN DAY

Seminar exploring Literature, Music and Science

  

7:00pm | A NIGHT OF LOCAL TUDOR ACCIDENTS

Oxford's Hidden Histories by Prof Steven Gunn

 

Saturday 11 November

All day | ASSOCIATION FOR ART HISTORY

Careers day

 

9:30am to 2:00pm | CONFLICT AND COMMUNITY: PANEL-LED WORKSHOP 2

Textual Commemoration: Mellon-Sawyer Seminar Series

  

10:30am to 4:30pm | CAREERS DAY FOR ARTS, CULTURE AND HERITAGE

Careers Day

 

Sunday 14 November

All day | RAWAA

Hosted by Dansox

 

Monday 15 November

12:45pm to 2:00pm | DISCUSSION GROUP

Hosted by the Oxford Comparative Criticism and Translation programme

 

Tuesday 14 November

 

1:00pm to 2:00pm | LIFE-WRITING LUNCH: STAGING REAL LIVES

Part of the Fame and Shame OCLW seminar series

  

2:00pm to 4:00pm | APPLIED ETHICS GRADUATE DISCUSSION GROUP

Session 3 of 4

 

5:00pm | MODERNISM, EXISTENTIALISM, POSTCRITICISM

Gabriel Marcel Reads Dorothy Richardson's Pilgrimage

 

5:30pm to 7:00pm | ‘ROYAL GIFTS AND DIPLOMATIC CEREMONIAL: THE CASE OF JAMES VI/I’S APOLOGIE (1609)’

Speaker: Dr Tracey A. Sowerby (University of Oxford, Keble College)

  

7:15pm | THEATRE AND PERFORMANCE STUDIES READING GROUP

Critical reading group

 

 Wednesday 15 November

9:00am to 12:45pm | MEDICAL HUMANITIES EVENT: CHAPLAINCY WORKSHOP.

Illness as a Moral Event

  

11:00am | A ZEALOUS ANTHROPOLOGIST

Speaker: Jaanika Vider (Saint Cross, University of Oxford)

 

1:00pm to 2:00pm | INSTRUMENTS OF LOVE: THE RECORDER AS AN INSTRUMENT OF LOVE

Instruments of the Eighteenth Century Seminar Series

 

5:15pm | EMPIRES AND OCCUPATIONS

Joint session with the History of War seminar series

 

5:30pm | TRANSFER OF MEDICAL KNOWLEDGE FROM THE ISLAMIC WORLD TO BYZANTIUM IN THE 11TH-15TH CENTURIES

Speaker: Dr Petros Bouras-Vallianatos (King's College London)

 

7:00pm | ARABIC PHILOLOGY AND MEDICAL DISCOURSE

Part of the Islam and Biomedicine seminar series

 

7:30pm to 8:30pm | MUSIC: WALTER'S GEYSTLICHES GESANGK BUCHLEYN

Series of talks looking at cultural, legal, intellectual works from 1517

  

Thursday 16 November

10:30am | OXFORD UNIVERSITY AND THE NATIONAL TRUST: COLLABORATING FOR CHANGE

Speaker: Alice Purkiss (Trusted Source)

 

11:00am to 12:30pm | PRINCE GEORGE OF DENMARK (1653–1708): THE FORGOTTEN CONSORT

Speaker: Dr Julie Farguson (Knowledge Exchange Fellow)

  

3:00pm to 5:00pm | CASE STUDIES IN COLLABORATION: OXFORD UNIVERSITY

Speaker: Victoria McGuinness, Alice Purkiss, and Dr Sophie Ratcliffe

  

4:00pm | RELATING TO THE DEAD

Speaker: Dr Layla Renshaw (Kingston University)

 

5:00pm to 7:30pm | TALKING ABOUT DYING: THE BIGGEST QUESTION

Hosted by Healthcare Values Partnership

  

5:00pm | SEDUCTIVE LIGHT, DESTRUCTIVE LIGHT

Speaker: David Saunders (British Museum)

 

5:00pm to 7:00pm | TALKING ABOUT DYING

A panel discussion with audience participation

 

5:15pm to 6:45pm | SEMINAR ON THOMAS FUCHS 'BODY MEMORY AND THE UNCONSCIOUS'

Part of the Making the Unconscious Conscious series

 

5:15pm to 8:00pm | DIGITAL RHETORIC, LITERAE HUMANIORES AND LEIBNIZ'S DREAM

2017 Besterman Lecture

  

5:30pm | LISA DWAN: PERFORMING BECKETT

Hosted by Dansox

 

8:00pm to 9:30pm | AN INTRODUCTION TO ST. AMBROSE

Saints and Sinners: An Introduction to the Four Latin Fathers of the Church

  

Friday 17 November

9:00am to 8:15pm | CONSCRIPTION AND ITS MALCONTENTS IN THE FIRST WORLD WAR

Conference

  

12:30pm to 2:00pm | REFLECTIONS UNHEARD: BLACK WOMEN IN CIVIL RIGHTS

Film screening organised by the TORCH Race and Resistance programme

  

7:00pm to 10:00pm | LOST LATE: NIGHT AT THE MUSEUMS

part of the Being Human Festival 2017

 

Saturday 18 November

10:30am to 5:00pm | ASTRONOMY ACROSS THE MEDIEVAL WORLD

One-day conference

 

 

 

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The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities

Radcliffe Humanities, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Woodstock Road, Oxford, OX2 6GG

01865 280101

www.torch.ox.ac.uk

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